Where's the Dem 'cut and run'?

A Globe piece saves me the trouble.

When it comes to pithy slogans, GOP rules, Dems drool:

Stephen Hess , a senior analyst at the Brookings Institution, said the phrase is the latest example of Republican mastery of political shorthand.

"Nobody uses a phrase like that in a favorable sentence," he said. "You're never honoring a person for cutting and running. [Republicans] have got a phrase that sticks to your ribs, if you will."


And, just to prove his point, the piece offers this:
"Instead of offering a blueprint for success, the Bush administration has used the Iraq debate to attack Democrats for wanting to cut and run," Senator Jack Reed, Democrat of Rhode Island, said at a press conference yesterday. "This amendment is not cut and run. This is about getting the president to do the job correctly, something he has failed to do."

And Reed is not even on the RNC payroll!

It's bad enough that the Dems play horrible defense against the GOP's slogans.

It's worse that they seem hard pressed to come up with any real zingers of their own: trolling up Madison Avenue, you'd need to go into the mailrooms to get one as bad as Together, we can do better!

(And the quality of the more sustained variety of prose is just as bad - as readers (how many?) of Real Security and New Direction can attest.)

To state the obvious, there is absolutely no reason why this should be so. Dems have access to great writers, at all lengths and in all genres, just champing at the bit to get off a sharp zinger or graf that will get the Dems a win in November.

The problem, as usual, must therefore be in Dem organization - or the lack thereof.

Mustn't it?

Tags: Frank Luntz, Iraq Withdrawal, Phrasemaking, Slogans (all tags)

Comments

1 Comment

Re: Where's the Dem 'cut and run'?

Too damned scared.  Oh, no.  Hollywood writers!  We get slammed anyway.  Let's benefit from our talent.  Use it.  Then Happy Days will indeed be Here Again.

by David Kowalski 2006-06-21 01:12PM | 0 recs

Diaries

Advertise Blogads