A.C.L.U. defends lunatic fringe rather than legitimately downtrodden!

I believe the ACLU could be doing a lot more good in focusing on
issues affecting the disenfranchised homeless and poor of our country rather than issues concerning religious symbols in our public life. The ACLU seems to relish unseemly, unpopular causes
like making a pariah of the Ten Commandments, "In Good We Trust," etc. I don't intend to go into further detail on this except to say, I wonder where this is all going to end?

Our public buildings, courtrooms, schools, etc., certainly need to have a theme or some type of symbolic expression of what we
believe in. It's important to our children to know that we stand for a particular system of morality and justice, both as a people and as a nation. Otherwise, if we do not do these things, then what are we? After doing some research,  I've come up with an idea of something that can be used without reference to G-d or religion. Finally,I don't profess to being an expert on the matter:
  Laws of Human Behavior

First,  Always honor and respect parent(s) for they have given you life and have sustained you.
Second, Only seek out the friendship of those who are truthful, honest, and respectful of others.
Third,  Never lie, cheat or steal. Always remember, your good name must carry you through the rest of your life.
Fourth, Do not walk in the path of the scorned, the immoral or the sinful. Never take what doesn't belong to you.  
Fifth,  Respect and revere the sanctity of marriage, such as your own and the marriages of others.  
Sixth,  Never act out of a sudden rage of anger, or if in a  premeditated state, to cause physical harm to another, or to take another person's life.
Seventh,Be merciful when you judge others, love the law, and protect your cherished freedoms, above all else.                    

Tags: A.C.L.U., church vs. state, ten commandments (all tags)

Comments

11 Comments

and

8. Don't tug on Superman's cape.

9. Don't spit into the wind

10. Don't pull the mask off the Lone Ranger.

11. Don't mess around with the ACLU.

by benmasel 2006-05-25 06:18PM | 0 recs
Re: A.C.L.U. defends lunatic fringe rather than le

You seem to not know what the ACLU does.

I am an administrative assistant for the ACLU Nebraska (for another couple of weeks, alas, I'm moving on).

On a daily basis, ACLU affiliates in every state defend the rights of American citizens in small, unpublicized ways. We help homeless people, prisoners, students, the mentally ill and any number of other vulnerable groups in this country on a daily basis.

And of course, we work to defend the rights of Americans who have been spied upon by their government in violation of the Constitution.

The cases you mention are just a few of the higher profile cases. And to single out those cases as being defending the lunatic fringe is not only a sign of not understanding what the Constitution and the Bill of Rights are about, it's incredibly intolerant.

Those that hold unpopular beliefs in this country are the ones who need the most portection.

If defending athiests and other religious minorities (which is not quite the best term, I know) bothers you, I suggest you read up on the establishment clause of the 1st Amendment of the Bill of Rights.

phat

by phatass 2006-05-25 07:58PM | 0 recs
Ten Commandments

The ACLU's crusade against the display of the Ten Commandments is absurd and endangers their other missions.  

I'm agnostic and liberal but their campaign looks ridiculous even to me.  

by Preston 2006-05-26 04:58AM | 0 recs
Re: Ten Commandments

Since when is the defense of an individual's rights in respect to the establishment clause of the first amendment a crusade against the 10 Commandments?

It may look ridiculous when viewed through a right-wing prism.

I'm not saying you're a right-winger, but you need to look at these cases more closely and ignore the Bill O'Reilly's of the world.

phat

by phatass 2006-05-26 05:55PM | 0 recs
Re: A.C.L.U. defends lunatic fringe rather than le


I would be very interested in learning how the ACLU would evaluate the following:
Five survivors in a lifeboat out at sea. One survivor, for whatever reason, decides to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. The others lunge toward the man to relieve him of the tool he was going to use. The man struggles with the others to retain the tool.In the struggle, the boat becomes unbalanced. Without a second to lose, the men rush the man with the tool and throw him overboard before the boat has capsized.

Please respond

by PoorBensJournal 2006-06-18 07:09PM | 0 recs
you don't need all of those rules

1. Love your neighbor as you love yourself

Everything else is gravy. But if you insist on a decalogue, like some people do, I'd prefer to use Solon's commandments.

by baric 2006-05-25 08:26PM | 0 recs
and ye harm none do what ye will

They are also investigating whether or not phone companies are violating privacy laws.

What are you doing?

by misscee 2006-05-26 04:54AM | 0 recs
Re: and ye harm none do what ye will

I never said the ACLU does no good. In fact, quite the opposite. I still feel strongly that the ACLU should stay out of any issues that would contest a nation's morese.

There are popular laws and then unpopular ones.
Sometimes unpopular laws can be very devisive and/or do little to serve the best interests of a nation and it's people. I believe our strength, as a nation, lies in our ability to unite behind laws that serve the common good of the people. As an example, it can be argued that the Ten Commandments have been serving the civilized world for centuries as a basis of our common laws. It can be further argued that the Ten Commandments were never intended to serve a particular religion such as Judaism, or any other religious need, but rather to serve the entire world as a basic primer of moral principles. Therefore, I believe it is only through the ignorance or lack of knowledge on the part of
ACLU that this has become a supportable issue.

by PoorBensJournal 2006-06-18 08:33PM | 0 recs
Re: A.C.L.U. defends lunatic fringe rather than le

You obviously have no idea what the ACLU does, or you wouldn't write such drivel.

The ACLU defends constitutional principles, and the bill of rights, against the encroachment of idiotic laws created by idiotic legislators who should really know better.

It doesn't matter if the person in question is a kook or a member of "the lunatic fringe," as you put it; if a person's constitutional rights have been violated, the ACLU is there to help. They are entirely non-partisan.

Let me ask you this? What if I don't happen to believe the same things you do? What if I pass a law requiring Republicans (such as yourself) to wear BVDs on their heads? What? You wouldn't like that? Well I'm sure you'd run screaming to the ACLU to complain that law, as written, was unfair. You'd probably then challenge this law in court, and the ACLU would be right there along side you.

The ACLU sees any assault on the bill of rights as an attack on the American way of life. Such absolutism is required as a bulwark against the encroachment of ignorance and fascism.

Oh, and for a courthouse display that "need[s] to have a theme or some type of symbolic expression of what we believe in," how about the bill of rights, a subject on which this nation can use a refresher course?

p.s You might want to cite an actual example of what you're talking about, rather than just presenting us with vague rhetoric. It would tend strengthen your otherwise very weak argument.

by Tod Westlake 2006-05-26 05:10AM | 0 recs
Re: A.C.L.U. defends lunatic fringe rather than le

Tod,

Do you agree?
There are popular laws and then unpopular ones.
Sometimes unpopular laws can be very devisive and/or do little to serve the best interests of a nation and it's people. I believe our strength, as a nation, lies in our ability to unite behind laws that serve the common good of the people. As an example, it can be argued that the Ten Commandments have been serving the civilized world for centuries as a basis of our common laws. It can be further argued that the Ten Commandments were never intended to serve a particular religion such as Judaism, or any other religious need, but rather to serve the entire world as a basic primer of moral principles. Therefore, I believe it is only through the ignorance or lack of knowledge on the part of
ACLU that this has become a supportable issue.
______________ __
Would appreciate your opinion?

by PoorBensJournal 2006-06-18 08:20PM | 0 recs
Re: A.C.L.U. defends lunatic fringe rather than le

Lucas,

Do you agree?
There are popular laws and then unpopular ones.
Sometimes unpopular laws can be very devisive and/or do little to serve the best interests of a nation and it's people. I believe our strength, as a nation, lies in our ability to unite behind laws that serve the common good of the people. As an example, it can be argued that the Ten Commandments have been serving the civilized world for centuries as a basis of our common laws. It can be further argued that the Ten Commandments were never intended to serve a particular religion such as Judaism, or any other religious need, but rather to serve the entire world as a basic primer of moral principles. Therefore, I believe it is only through the ignorance or lack of knowledge on the part of
ACLU that this has become a supportable issue.

by PoorBensJournal 2006-06-18 08:16PM | 0 recs

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