Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't need a president

Kos points out yet another Clinton insult to any Democrat who happens to live in a caucus state:
Of his wife's recent travails, he [Bill Clinton] said, "the caucuses aren't good for her. They disproportionately favor upper-income voters who, who, don't really need a president but feel like they need a change."
Now I don't need a president? I swear, I used to think that the Clintons were gifted politicians, but I don't see what they hope to gain by insulting large swaths of their own party. Can one of the Clinton supporters explain without hurling insults?

Tags: Clinton 2008 primary caucus (all tags)

Comments

34 Comments

Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

Well, gosh, I'm pretty sure "caucus state residents don't need a president" isn't a very accurate paraphrase of that quote.  I mean, if people are looking to take offense, go nuts.

by Steve M 2008-02-14 01:21PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

How is it out of context, exactly?

Bill is Hillary's worst enemy, really

by Cycloptichorn 2008-02-14 01:40PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

God, you guys are just ridiculous.

by Steve M 2008-02-14 01:45PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

You didn't bother to point out how the quote was in fact incorrect; I specifically challenge you to do so.

by Cycloptichorn 2008-02-14 01:47PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

Attention, Obama supporters: this guy is dragging your average IQ way down.

by Steve M 2008-02-14 02:05PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee
Rather than insult him, maybe you could try answering his question.
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 02:17PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

I leave it as an exercise for the reader, and for you, the diarist.  Seriously, it's not a very complicated quote to decipher, assuming we're all literate in English around here.

by Steve M 2008-02-14 02:21PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

Apparently you're not literate in effective argumentation. Point out your grievance or concede your allegation is baseless.

by beanbagz 2008-02-14 02:32PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

Seriously, you can't understand the quote either?  Maybe I was wrong about that "average IQ" thing.

by Steve M 2008-02-14 02:38PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

Your failure to specifically state the problem with the quote shows the empty nature of your complaint.

You have been called out, and found wanting.

Typical bs from Hillary supporters, and from Hillary herself; an inability to simply admit you were wrong.

by Cycloptichorn 2008-02-14 02:41PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

Uh, just because you can't understand the quote doesn't mean I am under some obligation to explain it to you.  In fact, it's looking like you are all suffering from some collective disorder that leads you to distort people's meaning.

I am really, truly baffled that you guys think the title of this diary is an accurate paraphrase.  I was going to blame NCLB, but I see a 16-year old commentor elsewhere in the diary is way ahead of you all.

by Steve M 2008-02-14 02:48PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

You're correct; you are under no obligation whatsoever.  But you look foolish, and you know it.

by Cycloptichorn 2008-02-14 03:06PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

Double yawn. Fake outrage is so tiresome.

by superetendar 2008-02-14 01:29PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee
I'm not outraged. Just scratching my head at why they keep up on this rather silly theme... people and states who don't vote for Hillary somehow don't count. Not a good way to build support if you think you might actually, you know, win the nomination.
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 01:31PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

It may be a silly theme, but  it is true, caucus states are just not democratic and the process is just crazy and open to manipulation. I think people who would be offended by Clinton's observation won't be voting for Hillary under any circumstances.

by superetendar 2008-02-14 02:30PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state residents don't nee

How exactly is it open to manipulation?  Specifically.

by Cycloptichorn 2008-02-14 02:43PM | 0 recs
Naptime?

Awwww, all of the Clinton supporters sure are tired. I guess watching the carnage over the past couple weeks has tuckered you poor lil' guys out.

Don't you at least have the energy to call the diarist a misogynist at least once?

by beanbagz 2008-02-14 01:32PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state

Bill fumbles with his words.  Obama does too. It is part of human nature.  Of course he does not really mean that there is a group that does not need a president.  However, it was stupid of him to seemingly insult them as being a group that 'thinks' they do not need a president.

Remember the footage of him falling asleep at that MLK event a few weeks ago?  Trust me, the Big Dog slips when it comes to tact/diplomacy.  Perhaps it is old age.

by findthesource 2008-02-14 01:48PM | 0 recs
Re: Bill Clinton: caucus state
If it was just once, I'd buy that. But they've been on this thing for weeks now of:

small states don't matter

caucus states don't matter

states with lots of black people don't matter

states with lots of educated people don't matter

It just doesn't make much sense to me as a theme to keep harping on.

by PhilFR 2008-02-14 01:53PM | 0 recs
He was refering to high income voters

Bill Clinton was clearly talking about high income voters when he said they didn't need a president. It is clearly dishonest to say that it was directed to ANY Democrat in a caucus state.

by HillaryKnight08 2008-02-14 02:22PM | 0 recs
Re: He was refering to high income voters
OK, but why don't high-income voters need a president?
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 02:26PM | 0 recs
Re: He was refering to high income voters

zomg.

He was trying to reinforce his theme: what the president does will have less direct impact on the daily lives of lower-income voters, so they are free to vote for big, sweeping ideas.  However, for low-income voters, bread and butter issues cut close to the bone, and they have trended to Clinton throughout the primary season, with certain notable exceptions.  

Are you honestly telling me that you can't read that into the quote?  I'm sure that the actual context of the full discussion (because if nothing else, Bill Clinton is really long-winded, even given that he's a pretty compelling speaker) made that even more clear.  

The constant outrage over campaign minutiae is absurd and disheartening.   Bill Clinton is not TEH ENEMY, he's the opponent's surrogate.  

It's not difficult to understand what he is saying and why he is saying it, so I just assume that the constant decisions y'all make to misinterpret and overinterpret his remarks are gross and willful, and in THAT case, I say: dude, stop SWIFTBOATING Bill Clinton.

by mgee 2008-02-14 03:07PM | 0 recs
Re:

I never said that they didn't nor do I think that they don't. But since I have answered your question, I will ask you this. Are you a high income voter?

by HillaryKnight08 2008-02-14 02:32PM | 0 recs
Re:
But my question is: why is Bill saying high income voters don't deserve a president? He's too smart and articulate to just let meaningless words pour out of his mouth. And I don't feel like sharing my personal income with the MyDD community, thank you.
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 02:42PM | 0 recs
Re:

If you want to know why he said it, I will kindly say that I don't know. And since you won't share your personal income, which you have every right not to share, then I can rightfully assume that you are a high income voter, since that's what you say in your diary.

by HillaryKnight08 2008-02-14 02:50PM | 0 recs
Re: this is the kind of fake outrage
As I've said above, I'm not outraged. It just seems like an ridiculous theme for them to keep harping on. All downside and no upside. You can bet that it doesn't play well in the black community, who have been told that they don't matter for... well, forever. Just wondering if anyone sees any real benefit to them in playing this tune over and over.
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 02:40PM | 0 recs
Re: this is the kind of fake outrage

I'm African American and I completely understand what they mean. I know that I matter.

by HillaryKnight08 2008-02-14 02:47PM | 0 recs
Re: this is the kind of fake outrage
So then please share: what they heck do they hope to accomplish by continually telling large parts of the Dem party that they aren't significant?
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 02:50PM | 0 recs
Re: this is the kind of fake outrage

I will only answer that you should read the quote yourself. It speaks for itself.

by HillaryKnight08 2008-02-14 02:53PM | 0 recs
Re: this is the kind of fake outrage
What I read is that they're trying to make excuses for losing. But even the excuses don't make sense. (High income residents of caucus states don't need a president?)
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 02:55PM | 0 recs
Re: this is the kind of fake outrage

So then, they didn't say that any democrat in a caucus state didn't matter, but that high income voters don't need a president?

by HillaryKnight08 2008-02-14 03:06PM | 0 recs
Re: this is the kind of fake outrage
I think we've already established that. The question still is, what the heck are they getting at?
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 03:42PM | 0 recs
Re: this is the kind of fake outrage
But all the prez candidates are also high income. Seems like a pretty clumsy attempt at populism.
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 04:46PM | 0 recs
Re: this is the kind of fake outrage
Well, sorry that you think half you party are "clueless idiots." I wouldn't say the same for HRC supporters. And here I thought I could have start a discussion that didn't involve insults.
by PhilFR 2008-02-14 06:22PM | 0 recs

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