• on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    Whether 'Mainstreet' is one person with multiple personalities or several actual people, there is one common characteristic amongst all the 'Mainstreet(s)': An absolute confidence and certainty of what has occurred, what is happening today and what will come to be tomorrow. There are shifts along the 'polite-rude' scale with each Mainstreet, but 'they' all consist of a kind of preordained certainty regarding I/P, that is the constant with Mainsteet and that is why my guess is that he is a single person.

    With that said, when he/they did not post any diaries or comments for a couple weeks recently, I kind of missed him/them. Was 'he' on vacation or were they at the "I/P Talking Points: 2009-2010 Update" conference?

  • comment on a post The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    Blair, in his soft spoken manner, spoke yesterday regarding the improvements on the ground (West Bank) that will help ensure a viable Palestinian state - without which a two state solution may just be an international exercise.

    http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?c id=1246443821636&pagename=JPost%2FJP Article%2FShowFull

    Blair said it was important to distinguish between the political negotiations, which US Middle East envoy George Mitchell was handling, and the work going on in terms of "security cooperation and getting the economy moving."

    "We are finding acceleration in these matters," Blair said, "because people understand the importance of it. Where there is improved security from the Palestinians, then there is some easing of access and movement by the Israelis, and then the economy benefits."

    That was always the theory, and it is now proving correct, he said.

    It may not be sexy, but the building and maturation of government, security and economic institutions by the PA and others are perhaps just as important as diplomatic engagement and consensus at the political level. Without these institutions, which lay the groundwork for a functional and prosperous society, a newly created state may prove to be short lived or hazardous for ones health. These efforts, of course, can occur simultaneously.

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    Hi, my name is oaktownchicken, nice to meet you.
    You should really require a better shift turnover as 'mainstreet' day changes to 'mainstreet' evening.
    I like the day shift Mainstreet, this one, not so much.

    A tip: know who you are responding to when you comment.

    Now if you'll excuse me, I have a two state solution to destroy...

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    Not sure who's comment you are responding to, but it wasn't mine. My comment was in regards to your misinterpretation of the polls findings which you presented.

    A simple, 'Thanks for clarifying that for me, Oak.' will do.

  • Wrong, being smart Jews we pay for our agents out of the $2B the PA received last year from world donors.

    That's how we roll, baby!

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    Read the poll you presented. It did not mention Israel as a Jewish state. The Palestinian respondents are simply rejected the state of Israel as is, regardless of the (non-existent) Jewish tagline.

    Where is the question does it mention 'Jewish'?

    Do you support or reject the creation of two states on the historic land of
    Palestine (a Palestinian state and Israel)?
    39.5% I support
    57.6% I reject
    2.9% No opinion/I do not know

    Palestinians do not accept a two state solution based upon the results of this poll. The two state solution requires the recognition of Israel. If this poll is accurate, then Morris, Agha and Malley are correct in their analysis and the two state solution really is just a foreign idea and it is DOA. And that would be very tragic.  

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    ...withdrawal or abandonment of settlements by Israel

    Really? Israel is expected to withdrawal from these settlements: Ariel, Maale Adumim and Gush Etzion? I think Carter would even disagree with you on this one.

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    You are correct, majority does rule. But it only takes a strong willed minority to undermine the success of the proposed two-state solution.

    But you are right, majority rules and according to the poll you provided 58% of the Palestinians reject the creation of a state of Palestine, if it requires the recognition of the state of Israel.

    This has become a theme of Morris', what is more important to the Palestinians, a Palestinian state or rejecting Israel? The two-state proposal, among other things, links the creation of 'Palestine' to recognizing the state of Israel. The two can not be separated.

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    The goal is not the creation of a Palestinian state just for the sake of creating another state. The success of a two state solution, particularly for 'Palestine' depends upon Israel and Palestine recognizing one another diplomatically, as well as, partnering economically.

    If you believe the the creation of Palestinian state which does not recognize Israel is beneficial, then you are in disagreement with the rest of the world, including Obama, the EU and even Netanyahu.

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

  • comment on a post The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    A new Palestinian election is warranted, which would, given current polls, provide Fatah with the mandate to build the necessary institutions.

    This much we agree, a new election is needed. period. However, not because ofcurrent polling, because it's the democratic thing to do.

    I read, but can not find the article, that Abbas wanted to push the next election date out again... ...until 2011 I think. Did you come across that article?

    I hope this is not true.

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    Thanks for the link, the poll is a bit dated, but these polls are tough to come by.

    I think the key difference here is how one interprets the answers.

    Do you support or reject the creation of two states on the historic land of
    Palestine (a Palestinian state and Israel)?
    39.5% I support
    57.6% I reject
    2.9% No opinion/I do not know

    Possible translation: Palestinians reject a Palestinian state if it means recognizing the state of Israel (this is even w/o the Netanyahu 'Jewish state of Israel' tagline). The response to this question may be translated as the Palestinians are not onboard with the proposed two state solution.

    Do you support or reject the creation of a Palestinian state on the 1967
    occupied territories?
    68.5% I support
    28.2% I reject
    3.3% No opinion/I do not know

    Possible translation: Palistinians support the creation of a Palestinian state as long as they do not have to recognize Israel or, shall we say, a two state solution.

    The poll you presented looks to reinforce the point Agha and Malley are attempting to make, a two state solution is becoming more of a foreign project. Regardless, under the best scenerio, a shocking 30% of Palestinians reject the creation of a Palestinian state based upon the 1967 boundries, regardless of how the question was asked. This is cause for concern.

    But I (and everyone else) agree with you that "What Palestinians support vary with the poll and the questions asked". Of course, you could exchange the word 'Palestinians' with the word 'People' in regards to polls in general.

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    I agree, there may be no other way to resolve the conflict, and as of today it is the best option on the table. As Malley and Agha stated is their piece, there is the risk that American, European (and even Israeli) passion for a two state solution could, in the eyes of the Palestinian people, make it a foreign solution which is imposed upon their society. As their article stated...

    The new millennium began with the near-universal acceptance of the idea of a Palestinian state, which is precisely when its support among Palestinians began to slip. President Bush, the first US president to have ardently endorsed it, framed it as the answer to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and then hurriedly narrowed the challenge to the mundane task of building state institutions. Gone was the revolutionary aura with which Arafat imbued the idea; the struggle, no longer about freedom and the end of occupation, became about erecting responsible structures of government.

    One of Bush's least noticed but most profound and pernicious legacies in the region might well turn out to have been this transformation of the concept of Palestinian statehood from among the more revolutionary to the more conservative, from inspiring to humdrum. A small fraction of Palestinians, mainly members of the Palestinian Authority's elite, saw the point of building state institutions, had an interest in doing so, and went to work. For the majority, this kind of project could not have strayed further from their original political concerns.

    Today, the idea of Palestinian statehood is alive, but mainly outside of Palestine. Establishing a state has become a matter of utmost priority for Europeans, who see it as crucial to stabilizing the region and curbing the growth of extremism; for Americans, who hail it as a centerpiece in efforts to contain Iran as well as radical Islamists and to forge a coalition between so-called moderate Arab states and Israel; and even for a large number of Israelis who have come to believe it is the sole effective answer to the threat to Israel's existence posed by Arab demographics. Those might all be good reasons, though none is of particular relevance to Palestinians; and each only further alienates them from the vision of statehood, the purported object of their struggle.

    Universal endorsement has its downside. The more the two-state solution looks like an American or Western, not to mention Israeli, interest, the less it appeals to Palestinians. It is hard to generate excitement among Palestinians for a project explicitly aimed at protecting the interests of their historic foe (Israel), defeating one of their political organizations (Hamas), or rescuing pro-Western Arab regimes for which they evince little sympathy. Many Palestinians feel that the notion of statehood has been hijacked by their historic detractors who rejected it when it was briefly a Palestinian idea only to endorse it when they made it their own. The process of legitimizing a state in international eyes has helped discredit it in those of its intended beneficiaries.

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago

    Also, if your distaste for Benny Morris is so great, you should probably stop refering to his previous works to support your diaries and comments going forward, as you have dropped Morris' name several times in the past.

    Morris is hated and loved by many individuals at the same time. Like you, many quote him as the subject matter expert, especially in reference to Palestinian refugees and then villify him for his other works, like 'One State, Two State'. Or visa versa.

    He has made some stupid/emotional statements, which he has apologised for, but his knowledge in the area of I/P, as well as Agha and Malley is second to none and it is silly to dismiss any of them due to disagreement of their observations or conclusions. Morris' work has been difficult reading for many on the left and the right and that, in my opinion, enhances his credibility.

  • on a comment on The Two State Solution? over 4 years ago
    Easy, easy.
    Lakrosse stated none of those things. He was not suggesting a transfer of people, he was suggesting a transfer of land.   ...The West Bank becomes annexed by Jordan.

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