Obama to launch "Joshua Generation Project".

David Brody of the Christian Broadcasting Network reports:

EXCLUSIVE: Obama Campaign will Launch 'Joshua Generation Project'
June 6, 2008

The Brody File has learned that in the next two weeks Barack Obama's campaign will unveil a major new program to attract younger Evangelicals and Catholics to their campaign.

It's called the "Joshua Generation Project." The name is based on the biblical story of how Joshua's generation led the Israelites into the Promised Land.


http://www.cbn.com/CBNnews/388366.aspx

A source close to the Obama campaign tells The Brody File the following:

"The Joshua Generation project will be the Obama campaign's outreach to young people of faith. There's unprecedented energy and excitement for Obama among young evangelicals and Catholics. The Joshua Generation project will tap into that excitement and provide young people of faith opportunities to stand up for their values and move the campaign forward."

For a long time, evangelicals and born-again Christians have been considered to be part of the republican base.  But that is changing.

A source close to the Obama campaign tells The Brody File the following:

"The Joshua Generation project will be the Obama campaign's outreach to young people of faith. There's unprecedented energy and excitement for Obama among young evangelicals and Catholics. The Joshua Generation project will tap into that excitement and provide young people of faith opportunities to stand up for their values and move the campaign forward."

Many young evangelicals are interested in topics like global poverty, ending the war, housing the homeless,  and climate change.  

Barack has spoken about the young people he has described as the Joshua Generation:

Obama spoke about the "Joshua Generation" in a speech he gave in Selma, Alabama in March of 2007. Read part of that speech below. It will give you an good idea of where the Obama campaign is heading with this effort:

Obama: "I'm here because somebody marched. I'm here because you all sacrificed for me. I stand on the shoulders of giants. I thank the Moses generation; but we've got to remember, now, that Joshua still had a job to do. As great as Moses was, despite all that he did, leading a people out of bondage, he didn't cross over the river to see the Promised Land. God told him your job is done. You'll see it. You'll be at the mountain top and you can see what I've promised. What I've promised to Abraham and Isaac and Jacob. You will see that I've fulfilled that promise but you won't go there. We're going to leave it to the Joshua generation to make sure it happens. There are still battles that need to be fought; some rivers that need to be crossed. Like Moses, the task was passed on to those who might not have been as deserving, might not have been as courageous, find themselves in front of the risks that their parents and grandparents and great grandparents had taken. That doesn't mean that they don't still have a burden to shoulder, that they don't have some responsibilities. The previous generation, the Moses generation, pointed the way. They took us 90% of the way there. We still got that 10% in order to cross over to the other side. So the question, I guess, that I have today is what's called of us in this Joshua generation? What do we do in order to fulfill that legacy; to fulfill the obligations and the debt that we owe to those who allowed us to be here today?"

http://www.barackobama.com/2007/03/04/se lma_voting_rights_march_comm.php

This is an interesting strategy, and could cause problems for the McCain campaign.  Though many young evangelicals are not pro-choice and may have problems with issues like gay marriage, many are committed to concepts of social justice.  Many are white, but there are increasingly larger numbers of Latinos and African-Americans who are part of the movement.  

cross posted to DKos

Tags: 2008, Barack Obama, CBN, Evangelical christians, general election, Youth Outreach (all tags)

Comments

101 Comments

tips for wider outreach

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 12:24PM | 0 recs
McCain already has a youth and evangelical

problem.

He's getting attacked on pretty much all fronts at this point!

I don't think Cottage Cheese Jello Guy is up to this challenge.

by LiberalDebunker 2008-06-09 12:25PM | 0 recs
It's a Big Tent
i just told junior about it and he is intereted.
by parahammer 2008-06-09 12:26PM | 0 recs
This is how the right hijacked the republican part

oh blech.

please, god no.  They either come on over on their own or not.  The ones that come on over on their own are the sane ones - they care about the environment and helping the poor and needy.  The ones that need an invite - sorry.  I don't want 'em

I am sorry, but this is how the republican party got hijacked by the fruit & nut cases they have now.  Reagan invited them in.

Obama has to stop channeling Reagan.

not all ideas are good and this one, I am sorry, is not good.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:27PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

Personally I think it's good to build a coalition.

And Reagan didn't invite them in. They got organized before Reagan was president.  They were part of electing Reagan and also turning the Senate Republican in 1980.

by politicsmatters 2008-06-09 12:32PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

yes, they were organizing before Reagan was president - and Reagan courted them and invited them in.

these folks that need an "invite" are nutters, for the most part.

the Democratic party has many strong religious folks in it;  The fundie base, with their attack & denial on science, is not one that I want in here.

it comes in, I leave.  period.  That is that.  

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:36PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

Wow, I usually find you to be quite even-keeled and logical.  This project is intended to bring in young christians.  I know some of these people.  They understand science, do not deny science or its conclusions.  They just happen to have a strong faith.

The people you don't want to come over will not be coming over anyway.  But to paint a whole group of people with such a broad brush is sad.  

Maybe we need to invite them because they are scared of being berated by people that call them nutters and fundies.

by CAchemist 2008-06-09 01:18PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

after seeing what the religious right did to the republican party, I think I am being even-keeled and logical.

As I stated several times already, there are already reasonable people of strong faith in the democratic party.

I do not understand this so-called outreach, as it echoes what the republicans did back in the 1970's and 1980's.

and look where it got that party.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:20PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

You act as if we will be pulling people from the right of the right and that they will then take over the party.  I think we are aiming to take people from the left of the right.  I do not think these people will take over the party and push us into social conservative oblivion.

Could you please describe the nightmare situation you envision if the democratic party attracts young active Christians?  Maybe if I understand the scenario in your head I will be better able to articulate a response.

by CAchemist 2008-06-09 01:25PM | 0 recs
I don't see the problem

Obama's not going to lie to these people and tell them that he's not strongly liberal; he's telling them that he and they have many of the same goals, and that even on the areas where they differ, he'll still take a more thoughtful approach than the kind of candidate that courts religious leaders for his own political benefit rather than an honest sharing of values (of course, it's hard to share values when your values are completely mutable).

The Religious Right destroyed the Republican party when Newt Gingrich threw the doors wide and told them that they were going to outlaw abortion and gay sex, then never followed through, because to do so would steal their greatest re-election tool.

by Dracomicron 2008-06-09 01:27PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

It was the Neocons who highjacked the Repub party. They just strung the religious voters along and used them to gain control of the gov, and threw them a few bones along the way. They know they got played and are now searching for other parties/candidates to vote for. Seems smart of Obama to invite them in.

by venician 2008-06-09 01:28PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

sorry, wrong.

the religious right hijacked it first.  Neocons were part of the republican party, but in small numbers.  the neocons fed off the religious right and used them, but the RR took over the republican party with its platform way before neocons did.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:36PM | 0 recs
You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

Why, because he could use them to replace the hillary traitors that are voting for McSame?

by venician 2008-06-09 12:38PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

huh?  

people will vote for who they want to.  no one is holding anyone hostage unless it is in your head.  

If you cannot look at the damage the religious right has done to the republican party over the last 30 years, then fine, invite the nutters in.  The republicans will then become the progressive party as the democratic party slides down into the sink hole that the current republican party is in now.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:41PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

Is everything you do based on fear? Obama is trying to expand the party by invinting people in, and you are against that? No wonder you backed the losing candidate.

by venician 2008-06-09 12:50PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

fear?  nope, not fear.

it is called history and learning from others' mistakes.  

what the republican party did in the late 1970's and onward was a mistake to many republicans.

your lame digs about who I supported is unwise.  I support the democratic nominee - doesn't mean I cannot criticize what I think to be a bad decision.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:57PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

Then you also should have learned that when young people choose a political party they tend to stick with it for life. Obama is encouraging Christian youth to "choose" the democratic party. Again, it's about expanding the party. Didn't we learn any lessons for Gore and Kerry?

by venician 2008-06-09 01:01PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

yes, expand the party but to what end?

look at the republican party today and tell me it is the same one 30 years ago.

I think that lesson is more important.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:08PM | 0 recs
admit it

it is the Christians you don't like.

The Right wing born agains have been pumped full of hate by their corrupt leaders.

Every year when the nut job ideas get pushed back the corrupt leaders need to blame somebody other than themselves so the hate ramps up.

Obama is looking for YOUNG Christians who aren't full of hate and those that are still in love with the word of Jesus.

A radical liberal.

Maybe if you get them before the Dobsons get their hooks in they might not turn out to be the people you loath currently.

by Is This Snark 2008-06-09 02:08PM | 0 recs
Re: admit it

stop

by hellomommy 2008-06-30 09:17AM | 0 recs
Re: admit it

your

by hellomommy 2008-06-30 09:18AM | 0 recs
Re: admit it

constant

by hellomommy 2008-06-30 09:18AM | 0 recs
Re: admit it

whine

by hellomommy 2008-06-30 09:19AM | 0 recs
Re: admit it

This is snark

by hellomommy 2008-06-30 09:20AM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

I think that is an inappropriate remark .  Why would you use the term "hillbot"?

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 12:46PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

Because they are her "supporters" who refuse to adhere to reality and are still marching in step behind hillary, even though she has encouraged them to support Obama.

by venician 2008-06-09 12:53PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

First place - the remark is off topic.  If you have something constructive to say about outreach to young people do so.  You can agree or disagree - but why would you go there?  
by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 12:58PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

My initial comment was that maybe Obama was trying to attact new voters to replace the hillary voters who are threatening to vote for McSame.

by venician 2008-06-09 01:04PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

anyone here?

nope.  Your comment is stupid and serves no purpose.

get over your hate.  let it go.

breath in.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:58PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

Yet you can "hate" young Christians..

by hootie4170 2008-06-09 01:23PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

I don't "hate" Christians, young or old.

What I hate is their message of intolerance towards gays, towards people who are different.  What I hate is their message about women reproductive rights.

take it somewhere else.  Not everything that Obama is doing is correct for our party.  This is one of the areas where I totally disagree with his so-called outreach.

Instead of doing an outreach to Christians, why not do an outreach to all people on the issues instead?  

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:32PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

I disagree, I think the younger generation are more open-minded about liberal issues.  They just need someone to believe in.  Remember the young Christians have had it ingrained in their head for the entire life, but I get comfort in knowing this generation is seeking out information and heartily believe in social justice.

by hootie4170 2008-06-09 01:37PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

they need someone to believe in?  don't start with that again.

If they are Christians, they already have someone that they believe in.

and if they are really conservative Christians, they aren't going to be as liberal as you may think

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:40PM | 0 recs
Re: You mean like hillbots are holding us hostage

I meant someone who is trustworthy, it's funny how some people automatically think of the "Messiah" inference.  Social conservatives also believe in prison reform, free trade, family farm, greater financing for education, spending focused on education and infrastructure and placement of tariffs on countries that do not uphold human rights.

These are issues that the Democratic Party can make some headway in.  It's not all about LGBT, abortion and creationism issues with social conservatives.

by hootie4170 2008-06-09 01:49PM | 0 recs
I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

in Puerto Rico who have ties in the Bronx - they do AIDS work, and are dedicated to helping in areas many social service agencies won't go.  

I don't think you should write off all young people just because they believe in Jesus.  

I'm not even a Christian - but this seems like a good idea to me.

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 12:44PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

I am not writing off young people who believe in Jesus.  Just a certain type.  Watch Jesus Camp and you'll get my drift.

most evangelicals who already do the type of works you mention are not really part of the religious right in the US.  They most likely already vote democrat or perhaps they just don't vote.

There are many democrats who have a strong religious faith - they just are nutty about it.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:46PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

I don't think Senator Obama is reaching out to right wing-nuts.  

There are many Pentecostal and Catholic youth who are not happy with the War, and believe deeply in the message of helping the poor.  

Why should Republicans lay claim to them all?

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 12:48PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

I think we probably got them if they are against the war and believe in the message of helping the poor.

the democratic platform hasn't changed radically over the last 30 years - the message has been there for them to see if they choose to see it.

I think other things in our platform has made them not want to vote democrat and those things I am not willing to give up for their votes.

my mother is a strong Catholic and votes democrat every time, even though there are things she doesn't agree with.  If she can do it on her own, so can they.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:54PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

the message has been crap though.

THis is a standard democratic principal Obama is offering to them, care for each other, social justice, the environment, etc. Just a lot of the young Christians have never heard our sales pitch because, we haven't been accurately to them. YOu assume they come to us if we sit down and do nothing. This is the equivalent of saying we win elections by putting out a pamphlet on a table and leave. It is assumed someone will pick it up. You go to people, hand it out and talk to them. That is how people join your cause.

All Obama is saying is he is pitching the Democratic message to Christian groups and that they are welcome if they want t help the fight in social justice, environment, etc.

by Trowaman 2008-06-09 01:25PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

it is a fine line between courting them on a limited set of issues and then letting the dam break once they are in.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:28PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

So you think the Democratic Party is going to give up their ideals because some young Christian Conservatives say so...I don't think it is about us relenting to their views, but is about giving the Democratic Party a chance to present our values and why we stand behind them.  The younger generation is more open-minded these days and I think the Democratic Party is feeding off of that.

by hootie4170 2008-06-09 01:33PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

you know, I bet there were a lot of moderate republicans who felt the same way back in the 1970's.

how many moderate republicans serve in our congress & senate(outside of the northeast)?

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:35PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

There are about 50 members of congress who belong to the Republican Main Street Partnership which leans away from social conservatism and towards fiscal conservatism and limited government.

by hootie4170 2008-06-09 01:59PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

I still don't see why we shouldn't reach out to them...Maybe some will develop other opinions once they see our positions and how they help all Americans.

To apply identity politics to all people is exactly why there is such a chasm in our country today.  Some people can change and only need to be open-minded about alternatives.

"You can lead a horse to water, he may not drink, but you can make him thirsty."

by hootie4170 2008-06-09 01:28PM | 0 recs
Re: I work with a wonderful group of evangelicals

here are many democrats who have a strong religious faith - they just are nutty about it.

that should read
here are many democrats who have a strong religious faith - they just aren't nutty about it.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:55PM | 0 recs
Actually, colebiancardi,

that isn't really true, and your historical perception is skewed.  The vast majority of Jews--including the ultra-Orthodox, who I presume fall under your category of "nutters"--are Democrats.  The vast majority of African-Americans--who are overwhelmingly evangelical, you might be interested to know, and thus would presumably fall under your category of "nutters"--are Democrats.  The majority of Hispanics--who are overwhelmingly traditionalist Catholics, and thus I presume would fall under your category of "nutters"--are Democrats.

The Democratic "nutters" are just as anti-abortion and anti-gay rights as the Christian Right "nutters".  The only difference is that the Democratic "nutters" were successfully convinced that issues of poverty and social justice were more important (and more biblically prominent) than the issues of abortion and homosexuality.  If Obama can convince some non-minority "nutters" of the same, that is a huge step forward for the country and the party both.

As for your assertion that "if they could be convinced, they'd already be Dems," to make a long story short: it's utter poppycock.  The main reason that many young white evangelicals (whom study after study has shown to be more social justice oriented on the whole than wedge issue oriented, and thus ripe for the Democratic picking) aren't yet Dems is because, for some odd reason, they feel hesitant about supporting a party that has consistently belittled faith as distasteful superstition and religious people as brainless dupes.  If some Clinton supporters stormed off from the party in a huff because of six months of seemingly constant insults, imagine how white evangelicals feel after more than two decades of the same.  The obstacle isn't belief, it's respect--namely, the lack of it.  And it's not just white evangelicals, colebiancardi, who are bothered by it.

by Elsinora 2008-06-09 01:57PM | 0 recs
agree wholeheartedly Elsinora

there is also a growing Latino evangelical group - there are many different denominations.  As I said up thread - many of them work with drug addicts and people with AIDS and are selfless and good young folks.  The majority are not college students - they are from poor neighborhoods and have never been "engaged" by either Democrats or Republicans.

But the attitudes expressed here by naysayers are certainly a surprise to me - so dismissive and disrespectful.

I  rhink thye'll make great Democrats - if we indicate the door is open.

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 02:11PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

Yes, god forbid that our candidate get more than 50% of the vote.

by Angry White Democrat 2008-06-09 12:45PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

I'd rather the person running get 45% of the vote and lose than throw my values under the bus to court neo-con religious nuts.

by zcflint05 2008-06-09 12:46PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

I think it is very closed minded to paint all people with religious convictions as "nuts".  
I think we should do outreach to Islamic youth, Catholic youth, Jewish youth, Buddhist youth - whatever faith system people ascribe to is fine with me.  

I have no problem with atheist youths either.  

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 12:53PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

you want the Falwells and Robertsons in our party?  Is that it?

so desperate for a win, you'll sell your soul (pardon the pun) for their votes?  And let them put their agenda, which 1/2 of it isn't progressive at all and the other half they don't talk about enough, on our platform?

is that it?

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:47PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

This has nothing to do with Falwell's and Robertsons.  

Do you really believe that every Christian in America supports those old bigots?

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 12:54PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

if they are republicans because of their religious beliefs, nothing in our platform will sway them over.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:55PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

Seems to me you fine with it was hillary was pandering to the gods and gun crowd in Ohio, Texas and Pa.

by venician 2008-06-09 12:55PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

The main difference is that she could do it without pandering by creating some Biblical outreach clan and (most likely) making policy concessions down the road.

by zcflint05 2008-06-09 01:01PM | 0 recs
Re: This is how the right hijacked the republican

troll.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:06PM | 0 recs
Not my style...

I don't know how I feel about this:

The name is based on the biblical story of how Joshua's generation led the Israelites into the Promised Land.

That's just a little creepy to me. I have no problem contesting demographic groups but pandering to religious conservatives makes me really uncomfortable, especally with such Biblical overtones.

by zcflint05 2008-06-09 12:38PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

It's not pandering if you're a Christian.

by venician 2008-06-09 12:39PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

we are a secular country.  

religion and politics - bad mix.

I don't care if it is the democrats that are doing this.  It is bad business.  period.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:42PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

Well it is the style of every politician in this country - Democrat or Republican - they go to church suppers and temples to issue support for Isreal, and to Baptist celebrations...

Martin Luther King was a preacher.  So are quite a few members of Congress.  

I am really surprised at your low tolerance for people of faith.  

See a recnt Pew Study:

A panoramic snapshot of American religious life in 2008 reveals an extraordinary dynamism that is reshaping the country's major traditions in historic ways.

Almost half of Americans have moved to a different religious denomination from that in which they were raised, and 28 percent have switched to a different major tradition or to no religion (i.e., from Roman Catholic to Protestant, Jewish to unaffiliated).

The fluidity is combining with immigration to spur dramatic changes in the religious landscape. Protestantism appears on the verge of losing its majority status. The number of "unaffiliated" Americans has doubled, to 16 percent. One-third of Catholics are now Latino and the religion is depending on immigration to maintain its share of the population.

These shifts are captured in a survey released Monday by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life.

"The extent of change in the American religious marketplace is remarkable," says Luis Lugo, the Pew Forum's director, in an interview. "Everyone is losing, and has difficulty retaining childhood members, but everyone is also gaining."

http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0226/p01s0 1-ussc.html

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:06PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

I don't have a low tolerance for reasonable people of faith.

however, that said, I do have a low tolerance for the types that seem to be targeted in this new outreach program of Obama's.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:10PM | 0 recs
And what "types" are they?

wow - what pre-judgement.  How many young Christian or Catholic teens do you work with? Know well? Teach?

I'm a pagan - but I respect the faith of many of my students - who btw - learn evolution in my classes (not creation non-science)

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:22PM | 0 recs
Re: And what "types" are they?

I work for a Jesuit university.  So I know quite a few.

I respect up to a point.  When their beliefs infringe on my beliefs to the point of wanting laws enacted, you betcha I don't respect that viewpoint

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:27PM | 0 recs
I graduated from a Jesuit University

Fordham - but there were plenty of students there with progrssive ideas and quite a few of my professors as well.  

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:31PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

But it's obvious pandering. The "Joshua Generation"? Come on. It just seems like he's overcompensating to go after neo-cons and steal them away from McCain, and what concessions is he going to give them in policy? No civil unions? Moderate or right leaning Supreme Court Justices? Moving to the right on Abortions? Those are the issues that the religious right focuses on, and he appears to be chasing after them now.

The thing that has always been disconcerting to me about Senator Obama is that I think he is far too much of a centrist, maybe even right leaning on a few issues, and it seems like he's resistant to hold strong on some of his left leaning thoughts. This makes me a touch more concerned.

by zcflint05 2008-06-09 12:44PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

agreed.

if these voters are already on board, they don't need courting.  If they aren't on board, how are you going to court them?

talking about poverty and helping people isn't enough - the democratic party has done this for decades and we can't get all of them.

the only way to court them is to do something else  - which involves changing our party platform to something like anti-choice or putting a damned marriage amendment up.

so, what else can we court them with?  Our platform has had poverty, injustice, environment for decades - these folks aren't coming over unless we sacrifice something else

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:51PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

These are young people - like some of my students - whose parents (here in upstate NY) are solid Republicans, and they don't have experience voting for either Party.

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:08PM | 0 recs
Suggest you read the new diary posted here:

Youth Voter Particpation Surge Largely Confined to College Students
http://www.mydd.com/story/2008/6/9/16591 1/1855

I think it's a bit elitist if all the youth outreach is simply to students in college.  

Some of those non-college students are evangelical - poor/ working class and Latino.  So we should just ignore them?  I don't think so.  

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:29PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

You are consfusing conservatives with neocons. And we're taking about young voters, he doesn't have to change any of his policies because of them. Try thinking of politics in a new way.

by venician 2008-06-09 01:18PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

nope, I am not confusing the terms.  

Young voters don't have issues or platforms?  Really?  They do, I did when I was a young voter.  And I worked to further those issues and agendas on the democratic platform, just like many like me did before and after.

can you be more condescending with your remark of thinking of politics in a new way?  lol.

politics is a game that has been going on for centuries.  and yes, every new group we court, will want their agenda and issues up front & center.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:24PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

They're not neocons.  

by politicsmatters 2008-06-09 01:54PM | 0 recs
not my style, either, but...

there are many young evangelicals and catholics who actually do believe in stewardship, conservation, preserving the environment, etc.

my thought on this is that these young folks were voting republican because they don't know any better. many of them were brought up in households headed by so-called "Values voters".  but these young people are finding that those values votes on issues like god, guns, and gays, are less important than having clean air to breathe and clean water to drink.

if obama can sincerely reach out to them and bring them into our tent, i'm good with it.

by annatopia 2008-06-09 12:43PM | 0 recs
Re: not my style, either, but...

so long they keep their denial of science at the door.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 12:44PM | 0 recs
well see

these young folks, they tend to not be deniers like their older brethren.  now yes, there are some deniers in there, but most of them don't give a shit about global warming.  these young evangelicals do, hence my "ok" with welcoming them in.

by annatopia 2008-06-09 12:52PM | 0 recs
Re: Not my style...

Well, I'm not sure its pandering if you don't change any of your policy positions that those folks disagree wee (i.e. abortion), but instead stress issues like peace and social justice.  

by HSTruman 2008-06-09 12:44PM | 0 recs
Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

have also done this type of outreach:

Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2006 12:11 a.m. EST
Hillary Hires Evangelical Consultant
Hillary Clinton has hired an "evangelical consultant" to help woo Christian conservatives in her likely 2008 presidential campaign.
The move comes after a similar political operative successfully aided Democratic candidates in several states in the midterm elections.
More than one-quarter of the nation's voters identify themselves as evangelical -- a voter bloc that has long been courted by Republicans.
Clinton's new hire is Burns Strider, an evangelical Christian who directs religious outreach for House Democrats and is the lead staffer for the Democrats' Faith Working Group, headed by incoming Majority Whip James Clyburn of South Carolina.
Incoming Speaker Nancy Pelosi created the group last year when Democratic strategists observed that the party lost ground in the previous election in part because candidates failed to reach centrist and conservative voters in rural areas, who tend to be churchgoers concerned with moral issues, according to the Washington, D.C.-based publication The Hill.

http://archive.newsmax.com/archives/ic/2 006/12/26/122609.shtml?s=ic

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:17PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

not happy with that either.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:25PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

so is Obama just ripping off a Hillary idea, which was a bad one to begin with anyway?

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:25PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

What a petty remark.  

No - you obviously haven't read Barack's books - or if you did you missed the point.  

His earliest community organizing work was with churches.  

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:34PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

cole is fast turning into a troll.

by venician 2008-06-09 01:38PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

oh bullshit.

I totally disagree with this outreach program - I have the fucking nerve to criticize it (which I WAS told it was OK to criticize Obama's positions) and now I am a troll?

STFU.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:39PM | 0 recs
Why don't you go read the post

above this one - by Project vote:
http://www.mydd.com/story/2008/6/9/16591 1/1855

instead of being so narrow minded - take a good look at the numbers.

A lot of younger people who don't go to college - may attend a church or youth group affiliated with a church.  

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:42PM | 0 recs
Re: Why don't you go read the post

I've already read it.  

I don't know why you state I am narrow minded - I've seen first hand what the religious fervor has done to the republican party.

I wish our country would be more reasonable when it comes to religion.  I don't see the brits making such a sink over religion with their politics.

unlike here.

I stand by the fact we are a secular country.  If Obama wants to reach out to them, so be it.  But I don't find some of the young folks who are really deep believers to be more inclined to have more liberal views.

that is why I feel it is a waste of time to just promote this issue to them.  

Do a broader outreach program that includes everyone, not just Christians.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:46PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others
Temper, Temper Temper!
What you seem to be criticizing is Christians, and you also keep trying to merge any Christian with the radical Christian right.
by venician 2008-06-09 01:48PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

not every Christian.  I've read the article.  

He is targeting two types of Christians.  

one of them is part of the radical right.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:49PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

then stop being an ass. the only trolling in this thread is from you. she disagrees and you go on the knee-jerk attack calling names making stupid accusations and trying to disrupt the site.

by zerosumgame 2008-06-09 04:41PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

You can disagree all you want. Hell, I am 50/50 on whether I agree with it or not, and I can certainly see the dangers you talk about.

However the "ripping off" comment wasn't a disagreement with this program, it had nothing to do with whether you agree with it or not, and it certainly wasn't supposed to be an argument of any sort -- it was merely a completely trollish insult you decided to spew.

When you trash ideas as "ripped off" then you're not discussing, disagreeing or debating, merely trolling.

by Aris Katsaris 2008-06-09 10:59PM | 0 recs
Re: Hillary Clinton, Nancy Pelosi and others

yes, because he knew that was how to reach them.  He worked with the churches to get to the folks he needed to get to.

however, I stand by my statement.  regardless who came up with the courting of whom first, it is a bad idea to promote it in this manner.

I posted this earlier upthread, but instead of courting Christians with this agenda, why not outreach to all voters with this agenda?

It isn't just Christians who are concerned about the poor or the planet.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:38PM | 0 recs
Because when you are targeting young

people - you don't always do it in a "genral way".

That's true of any demographic.  Those are just good on-the ground organizing skills.  

I did community organizing for many years.  I didn't talk to young people the same way as I might to a group of seniors - some of the issues are the same but many are not.  Young people are not yet concerned about social security.  They may however be concerned about global warming - or other green issues, or drugs, or date rape.

My students are actually very concerned about Darfur.  The young adults I work with who are in street gangs in NYC - are not college students - they have other concerns.  Most don't vote.  They don't see the point.  That is beginning to change.  

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:48PM | 0 recs
Re: Because when you are targeting young

a target for young people.  A general outreach to what young people want.  

sorry, I should have clarified.  And not every young person is religious.  Most of the ones I know aren't.

by colebiancardi 2008-06-09 01:51PM | 0 recs
Re: Obama to

well most young people are already on board, and to my knowledge the ones that aren't are one issue based voters: abortion. Most young'ens is on board....

by alyssa chaos 2008-06-09 12:43PM | 0 recs
I don't believe most youngun's are already

on board.  College students maybe.  But there are a whole lot of young people who don't fit into the college demographic.

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:50PM | 0 recs
Let's not fool ourseves


The number of people that could be potentially attracted are like statistically insignificant.

Obama is waisting his time.

Obama is not running against Bush. He is running against McCain who, like it or not, is a very centrist figure in American politic.

He'd better focus on the reagan democrats who,  I assure you, don't watch CBN (Mostely because they cannot afford extended cable).

On a final note:

  1. Don't watch CBN
  2. Don't quote CBN
  3. Don't acknoledge its existence

thank you

by TaiChiMaster 2008-06-09 01:03PM | 0 recs
Many Puerto Ricans watch CBN

 but this isn't about CBN - the article just happened to be reported there.

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:18PM | 0 recs
Re: Let's not fool ourseves

Not fooling anyone - suggest you read the diary above mine:

http://www.mydd.com/story/2008/6/9/16591 1/1855

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:35PM | 0 recs
"Joshua Generation Project".

"Reagan Democrats" no longer exist. They are now,and have been for some time Republicans. So in fact Obama is doing what you suggest.

by venician 2008-06-09 01:14PM | 0 recs
What's the problem?

It's great that he's doing this.  As long as they don't give these kids the idea that he'll do things that he's not going to do, I don't see the trouble in betting on the idealism of the young religious population.

It will certainly give McCain some headaches when these kids "convert" their parents on environment and war issues.

Youth outreach is one of the big reasons Obama did so well in Wisconsin: they have a huge and well-organized public university system in that state, and the kids took the case to their parents. That's definitely the way to a parent's heart, and I think the parents of religious children may just be reminded of when they were young, idealistic, and more interested in doing good fighting for something than against the things that the politicians said they should be against.

I don't think that this will be a huge project, but it can't hurt.

by Dracomicron 2008-06-09 01:38PM | 0 recs
compassionate conservativism

A lot of evangelicals are unhappy with Republicans because they thought Bush meant it when he talked about compassionate conservatives.  People who worked in the faith-based office in the WH - like evangelical David Kuo and Catholic John Dilulio - went away disillusioned because it turned out that it was just a way to play politics -- to attract moderates and as well as evangelicals.

Not everyone in a particular religious group is the same and they vary in terms of what issues are important. For some Catholics, social justice for the poor is more important than abortion. The same for evangelicals.  

If the Democrats don't undermine their core concern with equality - and I don't see Obama doing this - we are better off bringing along these folks if they are joining based on common cause.  

Obama's not going to get a majority of those people, but he can cut the margin and also keep evangelicals ambivalent about McCain.  And that's part of building a winning electoral coalition.

by politicsmatters 2008-06-09 01:43PM | 0 recs
Thank you n/t

by NeciVelez 2008-06-09 01:52PM | 0 recs
Re: Thank you n/t

We are stronger working together.  And we worship an awesome God in the blue states.  

Religious folks have always been a part of progressive causes - always.

by politicsmatters 2008-06-09 01:58PM | 0 recs
Most of them are gay bashers and against choice!

The people he is trying to reach are gay bashers and against choice!

by indydem99 2008-06-09 03:14PM | 0 recs

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