Wingnut Exposed: Brownback in Rolling Stone

Jeff Sharlet, an expert on the religious right, has a profile of Senator Sam Brownback in this week's edition of Rolling Stone. A quote from the article to start us off:
Brownback's wife, Mary, heiress to a Midwest newspaper fortune, married Sam during her final year of law school and boasts that she has never worked outside the home. "Basically," she says, "I live in the kitchen." From her spot by the stove, Mary monitors all media consumed by her kids. The Brownbacks block several channels, but even so, innuendos slip by, she says, and the nightly news is often "too sexual." The children, Mary says, "exude their faith." The oldest kids "opt out" of sex education at school.
Oh there is more
We all know that Brownback is a bit crazy. He is the one who is pushing the Anti-Gay Marriage Constitutional Amendment in the Senate and also the one who has been threatening Washington DC over their tolerant stance to gay and lesbian couples. While he relies on the bible for justification, he picks and choses what to believe:
Homosexuality may not be sanctioned by the Bible, but slavery is -- by Old and New Testaments alike. Brownback thinks slavery is wrong, of course, but the Bible never is. How does he square the two? "I've wondered on that very issue," he says. He tentatively suggests that the Bible views slavery as a "person-to-person relationship," something to be worked out beyond the intrusion of government. But he quickly abandons the argument; calling slavery a personal choice, after all, is awkward for a man who often compares slavery to abortion.
If this hasn't whet your appetite enough, I'll leave you with one more choice quotation from the comprehensive story:
Over the last six decades, Bredesen has prayed with so many presidents and prime ministers and kings that he can barely remember their names..."He wants to be president," Bredesen tells the congregation. "He is marvelously qualified to be president." But, he adds, there is something Brownback wants even more: "And that is, on the last day of your earthly life, to be able to say, 'Father, the work you gave me to do, I have accomplished!'" Bredesen, shrunken with age, leans forward and glares at Brownback."Is that true?" he demands."Yes," Brownback says softly."Friends!" The old man's voice is suddenly a trumpet. "Sam . . . says . . . yes!" The crowd roars. Those occupying the front rows lay hands on the contender. Brownback takes the stage. He begins to pace. In front of secular audiences he's a politician, stiff and wonky. Here, he's a preacher, not sweaty but smooth, working a call-and-response with the back rows. "I used to run on Sam power," he says."Uh-uh," someone shouts. To quiet his ambition, Brownback continues, he used to take sleeping pills. "Oh, Lord!" Now he runs on God power. "Hallelujah!"
For all the latest news on Brownback's political moves and ambitions, have a look at the Anti Sam Brownback Blog. Lovingly cared for by your's truly for almost a year.

Tags: 2008, Brownback, Dominionism, The Fellowship (all tags)

Comments

4 Comments

Re: Wingnut Exposed: Brownback in Rolling Stone

The conventional wisdom -- in DC at least -- is that the Republican race will come down to 2 candidates, one from the social conservative wing of the party (Brownback, Allen are the two names we hear most) and one from the more economic conservative wing (McCain? Rudy Giuliani?).  I'm not sure where Rommney would fall on that scale.

Anyway, Brownback clearly needs to firm up his base with the social conservatives and I did not see anything in the post above that could hurt him with the crowd he is courting now.  I can almost see his wife in that kitchen, monitoring the media, in an ad broadcast in Iowa.  Iowa is the big one.

by howardpark 2006-01-26 05:47PM | 0 recs
Re: Wingnut Exposed: Brownback in Rolling Stone

You are correct that Iowa is the big one.  Brownback will never have a chance in NH, so he must make Iowa count.

An interesting fact about his Iowa entanglements:  Brownback's law school buddy, Chuck Hurley, is now the president of the Iowa Family Policy Center.  The IFPC is one of the largest religious conservative organizations in Iowa and claims members in every county.  Hurley has already pledged his full support of a Brownback presidential run.  It could be quite the caucus boost...

by KansasNate 2006-01-26 07:09PM | 0 recs
Maybe because I live in Kansas

I get to see more Brownback looniness than the average voter, but I find it (nearly, I guess) incomprehensible that this right-wing idiot could even hope to get enough votes to become president.

The only person on the Kansas political landscape who's crazier than Brownback is the AG, Phil Kline.

If he got the nod from the GOP, I think the Democrats, if they can mount a decent campaign (which is not a trivial "if"), would win in a walk.  There are enough moderate voters out there concerned about creeping tyranny and theocracy; if we can only show them what Brownback's idea of "being a person of integrity" really means, he'd lose badly.

Or maybe not.  Maybe I'm dreaming...

by Marc in KS 2006-01-27 02:01AM | 0 recs
Re: Wingnut Exposed: Brownback in Rolling Stone

howardpark said:

The conventional wisdom -- in DC at least -- is that the Republican race will come down to 2 candidates, one from the social conservative wing of the party (Brownback, Allen are the two names we hear most) and one from the more economic conservative wing (McCain? Rudy Giuliani?).  I'm not sure where Romney would fall on that scale.

Well, folks here in Massachusetts know pretty well just right where he falls: solid stony neocon, with a slick, velvety "pseudoliberal" exterior. I will be surprised if he is not he next Preuglican presidential "offering." (Even though he happens to be Mormon and all. Which gets quite tricky. Let's just say that a huge majority of them are pronounced "Preuglican" at birth. Hell, neocon too...)

by blues 2006-01-28 12:51PM | 0 recs

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