"Not On Our Watch" v. "Not In Our Name"

Ever since the anti-war rallies in 2002, I've been somewhat anxious about the "Not in Our Name" slogan.  I certainly agree that those who can do so safely have a moral responsibility to speak out against injustice whether or not the immediate impact of that speech is clear.  But I think the "Not in Our Name" rhetoric has a way of shifting the focus away from using mass mobilization to avert catastrophe and towards insulating one's self from future responsibility for catastrophe.  I don't think it's a stretch to hear in chants of "Not in Our Name" a grudging resignation that war will be conducted in someone else's.  That the Iraq War took place, and continues, is a reality for which all of us with the privileges and burdens of American citizenship bear some measure of responsibility.  So while I think it's good and reasonable for Americans at home and abroad to share their opposition to the Bush administration, the eagerness with which some on the left have embraced "Don't Blame Me - I Didn't Vote For Him" bumper stickers and buttons seems to evince too much pride in personal purity and too little sense of personal responsibility.

This is why I was glad to see the Save Darfur Coalition take on the slogan "Not On Our Watch." While I do believe that we have a particular responsibility to avert crimes perpetrated by our own government, I'm glad that a comparative lack of concern with allowing the Darfur genocide to be perpetrated in our names led the coalition to instead commit to stopping it from transpiring on our watch.  "Not On Our Watch" acknowledges a common moral responsibility for the crimes which take place within communities large or small of which we are a part.  When Americans take to the streets to avert a war with Iran, it would make a worthy slogan.

Tags: citizenship, Darfur, Iraq, protest, rallies, Slogans (all tags)

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