Politics in the Bedroom

Last year, Grover Norquist told a New York Times reporter that he had little trouble getting the culture warriors over at the Eagle Forum to stand with the auto industry in opposition fuel efficiency standards because "it's backdoor family planning. You can't have nine kids in the little teeny cars." Certainly, leaders on the modern American right, as well as the left, struggles with how to keep its constituent movements working constructively together, or at least keep them from actively undercutting each other.  But those struggles seem to turn out better on the right.  Arguably, that's because the right has real power to mete out amongst the groups and individuals who make it work and can therefore keep them in line.  But there's as strong a case to be made that being out of power is more unifying - that's why, in the fall of 2004, well-justified and broadlyy shared anti-Bushism made it so much easier to imagine that there really was a coherent, unified left in this country.

That example itself suggests one of the problems we face: while there's more discussion these days about the importance of broad-based, multi-issue progressive coalitions, the people most vocally pushing for them want such coalitions to work essentially as extensions of Democratic Congressional and Senate Campaign Committees.  "Netroots" folks like Kos actually pride themselves on their lack of ideology (and get vouched for on this count over at The New Republic.  Meanwhile, while a certain amount of the hand-wringing on the right about Bush's supposed unconservatism is just a strategic response to his unpopularity - that is, an attempt to save the conservative brand from public dislike of its most prominent example - there is a genuine gap between certain aspects of what Bush is doing and the preferences of the grassroots activists and house intellectuals of the conservative movement, and it seems to be spurring renewed consideration at least in the pages of the right-wing mags about whether there can be a multi-issue conservative ideological coalition that's not a partisan one.  If conservatives do a better job than liberals of organizing across issues for a vision beyond the electoral fortunes of a party, even as conservatives and not liberals are running the government, then the left will have been outmaneuvered again.

That's why folks across the left should be excited about UNITE HERE's Sleep With the Right People campaign, part of the union's international Hotel Workers Rising project, through which hotelworkers in cities all over North America are using concurrent contract expirations to leverage strategic pressure on major hotel chains to raise the standard of living for all their workers and agree to fair organizing conditions for those without collective bargaining rights (I start work with HWR tomorrow; views expressed here are my own).  Sleep With the Right People represents a crucial alliance of progressives committed to the dignity and empowerment of people too often marginalized based on sexuality, class, gender, race, or the intersection of these identities.  As Hugh argues here and here, this campaign represents a critical stand against the view that "difference" should be "a cause of fear." It recognizes the interconnectedness of the freedoms to join a partner in building a life together, and to partner with co-workers to build a more democratic workplace, each without sacrificing safety from violence or freedom from want.  It's a step towards the ameliorating the too-frequent insensitivity of the labor movement towards identities other than class and the too-frequent insensitivity of the LGBTQ movement towards identities other than sexuality.  There are more steps ahead.

Tags: coalition, Labor, left, LGBT, movement, queer, Right, union (all tags)

Comments

1 Comment

Re: Politics in the Bedroom

There are three major groups in the Republican coalition: business, nationalists (including the military) and the social conservatives.

Usually it is fairly easy to please them all. In fact, many Republicans would consider themselves part of multiple groups.

Business wants lower taxes and less regulation. They aren't too concerned about defense spending or about cultural issues.

Nationalists want a strong military. They also want the US to maintain its cultural identity. They do not care about most of the social issue nor do they really care about tax and regulation issues.

Social conservatives want the government to promote their moral values. They are not particularly concerned with military issues or with tax policy.

The immigration issue is odd because it is one of the few issues that can truly divide the Republican coalition. Business is solidly pro-immigration, while a majority of the other groups are against it.

by wayward 2006-06-04 12:31PM | 0 recs

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