The Morals Of A Gnat

     As I watched the rant of CNBC analyst Rick Santelli concerning the proposed housing bailout of the Obama administration I couldn't help but think is this where we have evolved to as a country? Where our chief concern is what's in it for me. Have we gotten to the place where we are taking our moral cues from the same greedy, profit at all cost mentality that got us into this mess? According to this crowd it is now immoral to help those who have become unemployed, sick, or homeless because they have had the misfortune of working for a company that had lay-offs and didn't have golden parachutes. Because these people are still fortunate enough to be employed and have homes then the rest of the world be damned?

    The popularity of this type of behavior illustrates how through the media and our decades of greed we have become desensitized to the suffering of others. We are emulating the attitudes of the "Gilded Age" prior to the "Great Depression" where as long as the misery is affecting others then it is not my concern. This type of behavior is often times seen in courtrooms where we blame the victim in order for us to not believe that we ourselves could be victims of similar mishaps. It is a response to a deep-seated fear and insecurity because deep inside we all know that we could just as easily be that victim. So rather than accept the possibility that it could be us we place blame and give the victims characteristics that reduce their humanity. In this case that all of the people who are being foreclosed on are somehow responsible for their misfortune due to bad decision making or some other moral deficiency.

    The problem I have with this guy in particular and with the recent criticism of the economic plans of this administration in general is that people are treating this crisis like it is just another recession and so all we need are a few minor tweaks and the system will right itself. Anyone with the slightest understanding of this crisis and of our history realizes that this is not the 1970's or 1990's where we faced market corrections and slight downturns and our solutions did not require radical departures from previous policies. The current crop of naysayers whether they be the greedy or the Republicans seem to be focused on the short-term, for some reason they refuse to look at the overall view. They take snippets of data and scraps of the solutions and say this does nothing to change the crisis this week as if we got here overnight. The problem with many of them is that they believe the history of America started on January 20th and ignore the systemic problems brought about by years of neglect and greed.

    What I don't understand is when did our morals become everybody for themselves? I find it hard to believe that we have become a nation of such selfish proportions. I was taught and firmly believe still that if my neighbor is struggling and if I can help him then I should. We are being bombarded by article after article and rant after rant about the ignorance of the average American for buying homes they could not afford or speculating on the real estate market. It is a common refrain of the right and the greedy to blame those less fortunate for their circumstances as if they were the ones who brought down our economy. It is like the welfare queens of Reagan claiming that every woman on welfare was a black woman driving a Cadillac and living in some fancy condominium. The sad part is that it resonates with people. It allows those who are selfish to ignore and overlook the suffering of those they see every day. It allows them to make judgments about those they don't know and based on those judgments walk by the homeless, the hungry, and the poor without feeling guilty.

    Have we become so jaded that our national conscience can no longer be shamed into action on the part of those less fortunate? It is a shame how the wealthy and the greedy have turned this into a referendum of the middle-class and not a condemnation of the greedy who ran our economy into the ground. While the CEO's are brought before the cameras not to be drawn and quartered for their excesses, but merely to be scolded like unruly children and sent back to their mansions and country club lifestyles. Yet those poor Americans who can and have lost their homes are told you were stupid and we won't help you. We reward those who have lost billions of dollars of other people's money and blame those who have lost thousands of their own dollars. Is it me or is there something wrong with this picture?

    No Mr. Santelli, the message our government is sending is not that you don't have to pay your mortgage if you are laid-off or you have a rotten loan, the message that our government is sending is that we care for all Americans not just the greedy and the wealthy. The message we are sending is that we are a compassionate nation and if that offends your delicate sensibilities then maybe you ought to relocate to a country where excess and greed are not frowned upon. Do I think that it is fair that I have to continue to pay my mortgage while others may receive some help? Of course not, but I thank God that I am not in their shoes yet! How about you Mr. Santelli if it is such a great deal why don't you quit your job and apply for foreclosure assistance?

There are many more wrong answers than right ones, and they are easier to find - Michael Friedlander

The Disputed Truth

Tags: CNBC, foreclosure, greed, Housing Assistance Package, morals, poor, Rick Santelli (all tags)

Comments

1 Comment

Re: The Morals Of A Gnat

There was a posting on DailyKos a few days ago (sorry, I don't have the link) from someone who is not laid off, not facing any health care problem, and not unable to pay his mortgage. The only problem he had was that, since his house was now worth less than he owed, he couldn't refinance to get a lower rate.  He was urging that this bill be passed so that the U.S. taxpayers could assume the risk so that he could refinance his home loan, in spite of not having any equity, at a lower rate.

I have no problem with any assistance program targetted at those who have lost their jobs or who face unexpected medical catastrophe.  However, I am against providing assistance to people for the sole reason that their home values have gone down or that their variable rate mortgages have gone up.  I'm not asking people to replace the money I lost in the stock market.  Why should I support them for the decisions they made in the housing market -- especially when, in doing so, we are artificially maintaining the high cost of housing and keeping those who made more prudent investments out of the housing market?

by markjay 2009-02-24 07:56AM | 0 recs

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