Fox and CNN polls show no increase for Bush -- so they find another poll!

Anyone who follows politics knows that the world is full of different polls.  Sometimes, polls all say the same thing, so one can make a blanket statement like "Bush's approval ratings fell in 2005", which, according to every poll I've seen, is true.  Even when reviewing each poll's margin of error, one can still conclude the statement that "Bush's approval ratings fell in 2005" is accurate.  What was the cause of Bush's fall in approval ratings?  That's open for debate (and plenty of folks here and everyone else in the world have weighed in with their two cents)

The latest spin from the right-wing is that Bush has "turned a corner", "hitting back successfully", or whatever else sounds nice and butch.  Last week, we caught CNN's Bill Schneider claiming that all recent national polls show President Bush's approval ratings increasing.  Not true.  A Zogby poll showed Bush's approval ratings going down -- that particular poll showed a decline.  Now, if Schneider said (for example) "some polls show Bush's approval rising slightly, while others don't show a change or show his approval rating dropping further" that would have been accurate.  Maybe not music to those who wish Bush's approval ratings would maintain their complete free-fall towards zero, but accurate.  However, when Schneider says "all polls", and "all polls" aren't saying it, Schneider is wrong (and CNN cites Zogby polls all the time along with tons of other media outlets, so saying "we didn't see Zogby" doesn't pass anyone's laugh test).


Today, we noted that Fox News AND CNN both highlighted the results of a recent ABC/Washington Post poll showing an improvement in the president's approval rating (from 39% to 47%, which of course still means a minority of the country don't approve of President Bush).  Here's the kicker -- both CNN and Fox News failed to tell their viewers that THEIR OWN polls show ZERO increase (or a slight within-the-margin-of-error decrease) in Bush'a approval ratings.

News isn't made by some machine -- it's made by small groups of people (usually called producers) who work with their on-air talent to create presentations to their audiences.  Do Fox News producers work in tandem with the Republican National Committee to coordinate their reporting with the latest RNC talking points memo to further a political agenda?  Maybe, maybe not.  Does CNN?  Maybe, maybe not.

So my question -- why are both CNN and Fox News ignoring their own polls and focusing on another poll to further the right-wing spin that Bush has "turned a corner", yadda yadda yadda?  I report, you discuss and make snarky comments.

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Comments

5 Comments

Snarky Comment???
-- why are both CNN and Fox News ignoring their own polls and focusing on another poll to further the right-wing spin that Bush has "turned a corner", yadda yadda yadda?

Because they aren't Richard Morin???

Richard Morin: See the last answer. It would be unsound journalism to ignore other survey results, particularly if they offer insights your own may lack. But to give them as prominent play? No, and I think it is unreasonable to expect us to.
by Paul Rosenberg 2005-12-21 04:44PM | 0 recs
You people watch too much TV!
Why are you still watching TV news? You know they're lying sons of bitches. I said good bye to TV news almost five years ago. Period. I was disgusted at the obviously republican biased news coverage of the Lewinsky scandal. I was agast at how the press dog piled on Gore for getting one detail wrong while the completely ignoring the glaring exaggerations that Bush made. The final straw came regarding the coverage of the Florida recount.

I get all my news from the internet. At least on the Internet, you can select the stories you read. Until the press starts doing their job - that would be, exposing the truth - the TV stays off.

by bushsucks 2005-12-21 06:32PM | 0 recs
Re: You people watch too much TV!
Because most American's watch TV and and those are the people we need to vote for us.
by jkfp2004 2005-12-21 07:37PM | 0 recs
what zogby poll?
I can't find the Zogby poll you reference -- there's a December 8 poll (ancient history) putting him at 38%, and there's a December 21 interactive poll jumping him to 44%.  Interactive polls aren't worth the pixels they're written on, so that doesn't count for much.  But I don't see any other Zogby polls.

The ABC-Post poll is probably an "outlier" in trade jargon -- random sampling inevitably gives you a wild result once in a while.

In case you're wondering, I've been tracking this stuff for going on five years --

http://www.pollkatz.com/

by drlimerick 2005-12-22 05:10AM | 0 recs
I disagree with those polls
Although the Fox polls doesn't show an increase for Bush, I believe the Washington Post polls.  There was an uptick in some of these competitive House and Senate and Gub election polls. Mike DeWine was trailing, no he leads, MN is becoming more competetive again, and Talent isn't seen as vulnerable as he use to be.  Something is ticking with the American people.  This is why the Dems capitulated on the Patriot Act and capitulated on the budget resolution.  They got hammered on the Homeland Security bill in '02 and they don't want the same thing to happen to them in '06.  There is caution to Bush in these positive poll numbers, at the end of the year, during Holiday times, people tend to favor the incumbant party, because of the Holiday season positive feeling.  Also, the spy story is on the horizon and it could tear the presidency apart in '06.  Lastly, the Karl Rove leak investigation could force Rove to resign.  The 6th year of a presidency is always the hardest of any president.  Look what happened to Nixon, Reagan, and Clinton.  I still think the Dems could pick up 3 seats in the Senate and 6 seats in the House and gain the maj of governorships, but taking back the Congress with Bush poll numbers like it is now, is even more difficult.
by mleflo2 2005-12-23 03:43AM | 0 recs

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