Hillary is NOT Conceding: Official Statement

OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM CLINTON CAMPAIGN:

The AP story is incorrect. Senator Clinton will not concede the nomination this evening.

(We know the source of this story, don't we. It's Barack Obama's Chicago-corrupt machine trying to suppress voter turnout in South Dakota and Montana -- they are freaking out at his HORRIBLE poll numbers.

READ THE WHOLE PIECE HERE:

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Victim of Bill Ayers Interviewed on TV: What Obama doesn't want you to know by Susan UnPC

Victim of Ayers and Dohrn Appears on National Television, Describes His Entire Family's Near Murder
by Susan UnPC

The story was based on the devastating memories of Mr. Murtagh, described in his op-ed, "Barack Obama pal is an enemy, too," in yesterday's New York Daily News. In 1970, Mr. Murtagh's entire family was targeted for murder by the Weather Underground because his father was a New York State Supreme Court justice who was presiding over the trial of the so-called "`Panther 21′, members of the Black Panther Party indicted in a plot to bomb New York landmarks and department stores." (The Weather Underground and Black Panthers were allies in their dedication to the violent overthrow of the U.S. government.)

Mr. Murtagh is "an attorney, an adjunct professor of public policy at the Fordham University College of Liberal Studies and a member of the city council in Yonkers." It is important to note that a longer version of his op-ed is available at CityJournal.org under the title, "Fire in the Night: The Weathermen tried to kill my family."

Tonight, in a two-part interview, Fox News's Greta Van Susteran, an attorney and host of On The Record with Greta Van Sustern, interviewed John M. Murtagh, an educated, articulate and well-informed man. Mr. Murtagh is a Republican, and isn't involved in either Democratic presidential candidate's campaign. It is important to note that, in part two of the interview, Mr. Murtagh refers to the findings of Larry Johnson about Barack Obama's eight years of employment by William Ayers, reported in "Why is Obama Hiding the Truth About William Ayers? Follow the Money."

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST AND WATCH THE COMPELLING INTERVIEW

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Barack Obama's Longstanding Connection to Bill Ayers by Uppity Woman

When This Man Was 9 Years Old, Ayers Bombed His Home
by Uppity Woman

Barack Obama reminds everyone that he was only 8 years old when his friends, domestic terrorists Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn, bombed their way through America. (However, Larry Johnson has proved that not only did Ayers support and promote Obama's campaigns from his first in 1995, but that Obama worked for Ayers for eight years. See: Larry Johnson's "Why is Obama Hiding the Truth About William Ayers? Follow the Money" and SusanUnPC's "The Game of Expedience.")

Well, John Murtagh was a bit put out by that remark because he was 9 years old when the Weather Underground tried to kill him and his family on February 21, 1970. Mr Murtagh wrote an April 30,2008 op-ed for the NY Daily News entitled, Barack Obama's Pal Is An Enemy Too. [BELOW IS VIDEO/AUDIO of Murtagh's interview.]

Murtagh's father was a judge hearing a case against the Panthers21, a group of Black Panthers who were being tried for planning the bombing of several landmarks and department stores in New York .

According to Murtagh, those two upstanding citizens from William Ayers and Bernardine Dorhn -- from New York Weather Underground Cell -- detonated three gasoline bombs at his home. They placed one bomb at the front door, another bomb on the front porch and they "lit" and "tucked" the third bomb underneath the family car behind the house.

The family heard an explosion but his father was afraid to leave the house because of a previous incident where scum balls opened fire on people fleeing their home under these circumstances. So they were essentially trapped in a burning house until neighbors told them it was safe to leave.

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Identity Politics and Anti-White Racism by Bud White

by Bud White
Recent polls show that approximately 30% of Hillary voters could defect to McCain if Obama is the nominee. That such a large swath of Democratic voters might defect should be disconcerting to superdelegates, to say the least. I've been reflecting for several weeks on my own unease with Obama, a man who was once my second choice for president.

Last month I attended a Passover dinner and the conversation predictably turned to politics. (For those who don't know, a Passover Seder is perhaps the first liberation theology ceremony, celebrating the Jewish people's Exodus from slavery in Egypt).

One of my dinner companions was a computer salesman from New Jersey and an avid Obama supporter. I told him that Obama's (largely) successful effort to paint the Clintons as racists had me doubting if I could vote for him if he were the nominee. He responded by saying that it was good politics and showed that Obama was willing to do whatever it took to win.

His acknowledging that Obama has been playing racial politics has me rethinking the idea of a racial dog-whistle, the notion that only African Americans, for example, understand that when Obama says "hoodwink, okie-doke, bamboozled," he means that the Clintons are treating them like fools, attempting to undermine the Clintons' hard-earned reputations as advocates for all Americans.

Most Americans who are paying attention, I suggest, understand Obama's use of race. Obama's problems with Bitter-gate and Rev. Wright underscore that Obama is not the uniter he claims to be, but rather a shrewd practitioner of identity politics.

I think most Americans are more culturally literate and less racist than the neo-liberals think (and perhaps as some neo-liberals are), regardless of their income bracket. Hillary voters understand that Obama, in cahoots with the Obamablogs and much of the media, has been willing to do whatever it takes to derail Hillary, and this includes smearing the Clintons as racists.

Click here to read the rest

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Obama Turns On the Race-Baiting Wurlitzer: Signs of Candidacy in Trouble, by Bud White

by Bud White

The Democratic Party consists of two warring factions, and the precarious coalition that forms the Party is on the verge of splitting apart. Working class whites are not naive to Obama's shenanigans. They've watched as the Obama team has smeared perhaps the most racially progressive president in our history as a racist, and they've seen Obama ridicule their concerns, faith, and culture.

The Obama campaign would like the superdelegates to believe that African Americans will revolt if Obama is not given the nomination. The more likely outcome-and this has actually been quantified, is that working-class whites will go with McCain if Hillary is not the nominee.

This is not because working class whites are racist but because Obama represents a wing of the party which encourages the trashing of poor white people, lacks an economic focus for their needs, and excuses the racist and America-hating rants of Reverend Wright.

Obama's cold-hearted tacticians aren't using these tactics because they are concerned about the plight of African Americans. They are trying to scare superdelegates about racial issues and smear the Clintons.

READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE HERE

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The Media's Creation Unravels: Why Obama Should Drop Out

Sen Obama should drop out of the race. Having just seen the new attack ad that the GOP is showing in NC -- condemning the state's Democratic leadership for backing Obama, replete with Rev Wright cursing America -- it is clear that Senator Obama is detrimental to the Democratic brand nationwide. As Jerome Armstrong wrote nearly one month ago, "That's fall-out from Wright, not against just Obama, but also Clinton, and most likely against the Democratic Party in general. It's branding of Democrats Obama, and Clinton, as anti-American."

Obama earned his lead early on, prior to being vetted. After he lost Texas and Ohio, the Wright videos appeared, shocking the nation. Slowly, information about his relationship to Rezko, and his affiliation with William Ayers have also entered the mainstream.

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One Obama supporter asks him to speak out against misogyny and sexism

My friend Hannah sent me a copy of the email she sent to someone named Tracy, who's in the field for Obama. Here it is, addressed to tracyinthefielf at gmail dot com:

"Dear Tracy,

I'm a 51 year old white woman, a mom, a grandmother, a lifelong
feminist and Democrat and a strong Obama supporter. I am however,
horrified by the blatant sexism that is expressed (and tolerated) on Obama's website. Most recently, I've been horrified by the Randi Rhodes performance, the fact that Obama supporters were cheering in the audience as she called Hillary and Ferraro "fucking whores" repeatedly.

My best friend of 30 years is a Hillary supporter and I am sure she will never vote for Obama because of the misogyny of so many of his young followers.

I find this distressing because I fully support Barack, have
contributed regularly to his campaign. But I am very opposed to the sexist comments that so many young supporters make with impunity.

I wrote to Obama, asking him to take a stand against sexist rhetoric and Randi Rhodes in particular, just as McCain did when the person introducing him at an event kept stressing Barack's middle name.

If he doesn't condemn it, it's the same as a tacit vote of approval....or worse, indifference.

If one of Hillary's visible supporters got up and did a stand-up
routine where she called Barack a "fucking n-word"(Hannah wrote whole the offensive slur, but I won't) you can believe
there'd be a firestorm.

If we, as Obama supporters, and Obama himself,don't stand up against comparable women-hating talk, how can we ask
Hillary's supporters to rally around our candidate when he wins the nomination?

I would love to see a dialogue on the Field between the camps, and on our side, some self-awareness and self-critique about the tone and tenor of the comments many of our fellow Obama supporters are regularly spouting.

I'd love to see you start a blog dialogue about these excesses. There are tons of us out here who are not comfortable with letting comments like this slide.

Thanks for listening,
Hannah Vrinsky"

I met my oldest friend in 1974 when she was 19 and I was 22 and we were both spiritual seekers and political activists. I'd been to India, she'd lived in ashrams; we both meditated and marched and worked for a better world. We were naïve, not as naïve as some of our peers, however. Hannah had grown up in New Jersey and when she was ten, her father abandoned her family for California in order to become a hippie. I grew up in Texas, along the Louisiana border, and my father suffered the mental and emotional disorders resulting from spending four years in combat in the Pacific theater during WWII and then another two years in some still undisclosed location during the Korean War. In other words, both Hannah and I came from screwed up families and we met at a time and and an age when people bond most closely with their peers.

We both marched against the Viet Nam war, worked for the passage of Roe v Wade, petitioned and demonstrated law enforcement to ensure the use of rape kits in order that more rapists would be convicted. In the 1980s we joined affinity groups to protest nuclear power. We worked together for farm workers' rights and legislation for abused children, and together we facilitated groups for women recovering from domestic abuse.

We have traveled together, helped each other bear children, comforted each other during break ups and divorces, and celebrated births of grandsons, bar mitzvahs and the many ups and downs of life, both big and small, that a long friendship includes.
In the early years Hannah and I lived in the same town, but we've remained committed friends even when our lives have taken us in different directions. When I got married, Hannah made us a beautiful quilt, each stitch hand sewn. And when Hannah came out as a lesbian, I stood by her as some of her immediately family, including her mother, withdrew in disgrace. Hannah met my parents before they died, and I went with her to visit her father during his last week of life. She is godmother to my sons and I am auntie to her two children.

Last year, when they removed a benign tumor from my spine, Hannah left her partner and kids behind and flew to my home to care for me after my surgery. This year, Hannah has undergone two surgeries for breast cancer, and beginning last august, she has endured the most intense series of chemotherapy given. She is now halfway through radiation.

Hannah is an ardent supporter of Obama, and I am perhaps an even more ardent supporter of Hillary Clinton. Hannah's oldest son was in the first Marine Expeditionary Unit sent to Iraq; she sees Obama as the most anti-war candidate. On the other hand, I think Obama is clueless about war--and about leading the country in general. In the beginning it was hard on us, each wanting the other to switch sides. We talk on the phone and email daily, and though we live 2000 miles apart, distance is no big thing when people have been so close for so long.

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One Obama supporter pleads with him to take a stand against sexism and misogyny

I met my oldest friend in 1974 when she was 19 and I was 22 and we were both spiritual seekers and political activists. I'd been to India, she'd lived in ashrams; we both meditated and marched and worked for a better world. We were naïve, not as naïve as some of our peers, however. Hannah had grown up in New Jersey and when she was ten, her father abandoned her family for California in order to become a hippie. I grew up in Texas, along the Louisiana border, and my father suffered the mental and emotional disorders resulting from spending four years in combat in the Pacific theater during WWII and then another two years in some still undisclosed location during the Korean War. In other words, both Hannah and I came from screwed up families and we met at a time and and an age when people bond most closely with their peers.

We both march against the Viet Nam war, worked for the passage of Roe v Wade, petitioned and demonstrated law enforcement to ensure the use of rape kits in order that more rapists would be convicted. In the 1980s we joined affinity groups to protest nuclear power. We worked together for farm workers' rights and legislation for abused children, and together we facilitated groups for women recovering from domestic abuse.

We have traveled together, helped each other bear children, comforted each other during break ups and divorces, and celebrated births of grandsons, bar mitzvahs and the many up and downs of life, both big and small, that a long friendship includes.

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Obama, Wright and the Race Card

by BUD WHITE What are we to make of Obama's 20 year association and $22,500 contribution, made in 2006, to Rev. Wright's Trinity Church? How do we reconcile Obama's highly praised speech and Rev. Wright's hateful words? In this brief diary, I won't touch on the numerous incidents where members of the media and other Obama supporters have suggested that the Clintons are racists or have played the race card. My point here is to explore Barack Obama's attitudes about race in the context of how he has run his campaign and the philosophical fountainhead from which he comes, namely the Afro-centric Trinity Church. For those of us who are committed progressives and Hillary supporters, there has been a disturbing trend of racial politics from the Obama campaign since his defeat in New Hampshire on January 8. The day after defeat, asTaylor Marsh and others have pointed out, Obama surrogate Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr suggested that Hillary's tears have to be analyzed. They have to be looked at very, very carefully in light of Katrina and other things Mrs. Clinton did not cry for, particularly as we head toward South Carolina where 45 percent of African Americans will participate in the process. Let's stop for a second. The Obama campaign was going to analyze Hillary's tears? What in the world does this mean? Of course it's a dog whistle towards African Americans in South Carolina, smearing Hillary by insinuating that she does not care about the plight of African Americans. For one thing, when were African Americans living in South Carolina directly affected by Hurricane Katrina? Many Clinton supporters, including myself, were as dumbstruck by this comment as John Kerry watching a Swift Boat ad. Perhaps it was only Jackson's over-heated rhetoric, a one-time incident we told ourselves. Ah, but then on to South Carolina. That's when the smears got worse. hen the Clintons were accused of being racists. First by accusations that Hillary disparaged Martin Luther King by saying it also took President Johnson to get Civil Rights legislation enacted. As Sean Wilentz of New Republic writes, "It has never been satisfactorily explained why the pro-Clinton camp would want to racialize the primary and caucus campaign.

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Diaries

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