The Use of Twitter in Times of Crisis

I was once a skeptic of Twitter.  It didn't seem to serve a very beneficial purpose to me, and I didn't find it to be as good of a social networking tool as Facebook.  I registered for a Twitter account, mostly out of spite, to see if I would like it or could find use of it.  This particular account was dormant for the better part of a year.

Twitter made news headlines a lot after the Iranian presidential election in 2009, where a base of protesters rallied support when many other media outlets/communication was blocked.  I was still a skeptic of twitter even after this, although I certainly saw its merits.

Then came the Upper Big Branch Mine Disaster.  I stumbled upon twitter a day or so before because an op-ed I wrote was retweeted by someone, so I decided to log on to see if I could get wrapped up in the cocaine-like twitter phenomenon.  

Once the mine disaster had occurred, I tuned into the Rachel Maddow Show to see Charleston Gazette Veteran Reporter Ken Ward Jr. being interviewed.  At the end of the interview it was mentioned that the public watching could follow Ken Ward for mine updates on twitter as they were developing.  I did just so.  

Literally every 15-20 minutes Ken Ward would update via twitter the continuing news of the disaster, keeping myself as well as many others informed well before any news outlet could.  In times of crisis, this type of information is of great importance.  When people needed to hear news of the developing aftermath, they would refer to twitter instead of other news sources because Ward was reporting right from the source.  
(as a side-note, I cannot commend Ken Ward Jr. enough for the up-to-date information at ground zero of the mine disaster.  Incredible reporting and truly an asset for the concerned and distraught members of the state of West Virginia who wanted to stay informed as much as possible

Though still not a double-digit tweet a day twitter junkie, I have started to use it more and have seen firsthand the use it offers in times of crisis.  Social-networking has become truly a revolutionary tool in politics and emergencies, as well as many other situations and outlets.

Just some food for thought.

 

 

The Use of Twitter in Times of Crisis

I was once a skeptic of Twitter.  It didn't seem to serve a very beneficial purpose to me, and I didn't find it to be as good of a social networking tool as Facebook.  I registered for a Twitter account, mostly out of spite, to see if I would like it or could find use of it.  This particular account was dormant for the better part of a year.

Twitter made news headlines a lot after the Iranian presidential election in 2009, where a base of protesters rallied support when many other media outlets/communication was blocked.  I was still a skeptic of twitter even after this, although I certainly saw its merits.

Then came the Upper Big Branch Mine Disaster.  I stumbled upon twitter a day or so before because an op-ed I wrote was retweeted by someone, so I decided to log on to see if I could get wrapped up in the cocaine-like twitter phenomenon.  

Once the mine disaster had occurred, I tuned into the Rachel Maddow Show to see Charleston Gazette Veteran Reporter Ken Ward Jr. being interviewed.  At the end of the interview it was mentioned that the public watching could follow Ken Ward for mine updates on twitter as they were developing.  I did just so.  

Literally every 15-20 minutes Ken Ward would update via twitter the continuing news of the disaster, keeping myself as well as many others informed well before any news outlet could.  In times of crisis, this type of information is of great importance.  When people needed to hear news of the developing aftermath, they would refer to twitter instead of other news sources because Ward was reporting right from the source.  
(as a side-note, I cannot commend Ken Ward Jr. enough for the up-to-date information at ground zero of the mine disaster.  Incredible reporting and truly an asset for the concerned and distraught members of the state of West Virginia who wanted to stay informed as much as possible

Though still not a double-digit tweet a day twitter junkie, I have started to use it more and have seen firsthand the use it offers in times of crisis.  Social-networking has become truly a revolutionary tool in politics and emergencies, as well as many other situations and outlets.

Just some food for thought.

 

 

CRUSH: Stella!! (Artois)

This week saw some very cool new media news including Chirp, "How to run a government from your iPad", why Steve Jobs caused the Iceland volcano, the new budget deficit video game (MA), Glee: the app, and of course Stella Artios - The Movie (starring you).

All this and more. Watch the video:

Twitter held its first developers conference, appropriately called "Chirp", this past week and revealed the following key announcements: it has surpassed 100,000,000 users (with more than 300 thousands users signing up a day), the site boasts more than 180 million unique visitors a month, and that twitter will be releasing every tweet to be archived in the Library of Congress. Up next in the spring conference circuit is Facebook, which is preparing to display its latest news at F8 this Wednesday.

In international news, various social media tools covered the latest British debate between the leaders of the Liberal Democrat, Labour and Conservative parties, providing instant snapshots of the country's reactions into the debate. More than 184,000 tweets were sent during the debate and Facebook saw even more action - with over 45,000 people joining the Democracy UK page, which featured a "Rate the Debate" app. However, Facebook crushed under the pressure as the swarm of traffic caused the app to fail during the event.

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg was among the thousands of unlucky individuals whose travel plans were delayed due to the volcano that erupted in Iceland and created an ash cloud that caused the closure of European airspace. However, Stoltenberg is also one of the 450,000 people who own an iPad, which is how he has been running the Norwegian government from the United States.

Congressional deficit Commission Co-Chair Erskine Bowles is hoping that technology will be the key to balancing out our national debt. Bowles has asked Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer to develop a game that will solve the national debt crisis, signaling both a new way to gain the interest of public, and opening up the possibility of fresh ideas by "crowdsourcing".

In other game news, if you are a Foursquare geek you will enjoy this new web series "Foursquare cops", brought to you by HubSpot and featuring the new police force the game has sent out to patrol the streets for cheaters.

Speaking of geeks, Glee fans are singing praises for the new "Glee" app, recently released and available for the iPhone, iTouch and iPad. The special "sonic network" adds a slew of interactive elements, making it more than just a music app. Users are able to not only sing and record their favorite show songs, but also share recordings, join people in their performances, and start Glee clubs.

And that brings us to our Crush of the Week, featuring another company who hit a high note with their innovative use of social media, the Belgian beer maker Stella Artois. But we don't want to ruin all the fun by just telling you how they did it, so check out their recent promotion to see it first hand.

 

 

CRUSH: Stella!! (Artois)

This week saw some very cool new media news including Chirp, "How to run a government from your iPad", why Steve Jobs caused the Iceland volcano, the new budget deficit video game (MA), Glee: the app, and of course Stella Artios - The Movie (starring you).

All this and more. Watch the video:

Twitter held its first developers conference, appropriately called "Chirp", this past week and revealed the following key announcements: it has surpassed 100,000,000 users (with more than 300 thousands users signing up a day), the site boasts more than 180 million unique visitors a month, and that twitter will be releasing every tweet to be archived in the Library of Congress. Up next in the spring conference circuit is Facebook, which is preparing to display its latest news at F8 this Wednesday.

In international news, various social media tools covered the latest British debate between the leaders of the Liberal Democrat, Labour and Conservative parties, providing instant snapshots of the country's reactions into the debate. More than 184,000 tweets were sent during the debate and Facebook saw even more action - with over 45,000 people joining the Democracy UK page, which featured a "Rate the Debate" app. However, Facebook crushed under the pressure as the swarm of traffic caused the app to fail during the event.

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg was among the thousands of unlucky individuals whose travel plans were delayed due to the volcano that erupted in Iceland and created an ash cloud that caused the closure of European airspace. However, Stoltenberg is also one of the 450,000 people who own an iPad, which is how he has been running the Norwegian government from the United States.

Congressional deficit Commission Co-Chair Erskine Bowles is hoping that technology will be the key to balancing out our national debt. Bowles has asked Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer to develop a game that will solve the national debt crisis, signaling both a new way to gain the interest of public, and opening up the possibility of fresh ideas by "crowdsourcing".

In other game news, if you are a Foursquare geek you will enjoy this new web series "Foursquare cops", brought to you by HubSpot and featuring the new police force the game has sent out to patrol the streets for cheaters.

Speaking of geeks, Glee fans are singing praises for the new "Glee" app, recently released and available for the iPhone, iTouch and iPad. The special "sonic network" adds a slew of interactive elements, making it more than just a music app. Users are able to not only sing and record their favorite show songs, but also share recordings, join people in their performances, and start Glee clubs.

And that brings us to our Crush of the Week, featuring another company who hit a high note with their innovative use of social media, the Belgian beer maker Stella Artois. But we don't want to ruin all the fun by just telling you how they did it, so check out their recent promotion to see it first hand.

 

 

MyDD on Facebook and Twitter

Just a reminder that MyDD social networks; you can find us on both Facebook and Twitter. On Facebook, it's a fan page. Become a fan and put us over 300! No, there's no reward, but you do get the satisfaction of being awesome.

And on Twitter, you can seperately follow most of the front-pagers:

  • Jerome Armstrong is @jeromearmstrong
  • Jonathan Singer is @jonathanhsinger (but Tweeting about the possibility of a new handle)
  • Josh Orton is @joshorton (and is able to Tweet more than blog these days)
  • Desmoinesdem and the Bleeding Heartland blog are @desmoinesdem
  • Nathan Empsall is @nathanempsall. I Tweet in spurts.
  • Charles Lemos is @charleslemos - Tweeting in English and re-Tweeting in Spanish!
  • Andre Walker and the George Politics Unfiltered Blog are @gaunfiltered
  • Jason Williams and The Side Track blog for Utah politics are @thesidetrack

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