Are you voting tomorrow?

From the Restore Fairness blog-

Tomorrow is voting day, so make sure you get out there and vote. Here are some things that might motivate you to make your vote count and have your voice heard in the 2010 elections-

Our friends at Colorlines have been running a blog section on their website called ’2010 Elections’ that keeps you up to date with all news, events, and information pertaining to the mid-term elections. Their latest entry features Senator Harry Reid’s interview with Univision in which he promised Univision reporter Jorge Ramos that he would bring the DREAM Act up for a vote again, regardless of whether he won or lost tomorrow’s election. Reid’s opponent is a Tea Party supporter Sharron Angle, who’s election campaign centered around a series of racist, anti-immigrant ads. Another article on ’2010 Elections’ illustrates the hypocrisy of Republican strategist Robert de Posada, the man who created the ad that advised the Latino community not to vote in this election. Colorlines tells us that after creating this ad that told Latinos not to vote, it turns out that he himself voted by absentee ballot in Virginia earlier this month. The ad says-

Democratic leaders must pay for their broken promises and betrayals…If we go on supporting them this November, they will keep playing games with our future and keep taking our vote for granted…If they didn’t keep their promise on immigration reform then, they can’t count on our vote…Don’t vote this November. This is the only way to send them a clear message. You can no longer take us for granted. Don’t vote.

It is exactly this sort of voter suppression that we need to fight by voting tomorrow. Our friends at Presente.org told us about this and other voter suppression tactics that have been seen impacting the Latino community and their allies around the country. In Texas, a voter registration group called Houston Votes has been the victim of a systematic suppression campaign, including baseless allegations of fraud by the local registrar, and a string of threatening emails strewn with racist insults. The result: registrations have dropped from 1,000 per day to under 200. In Arizona, Senator Russel Pearce — the same man who authored SB 1070 — is accusing organizations like Mi Familia Vota of “voter fraud” in a thinly veiled effort to hamper their registration activities and scare Latino voters from the polls.

A number of radicals are resorting to fear-mongering and scare tactics to ensure that certain communities are denied a voice in this election. In addition to voting tomorrow, get involved with an important project called Video the Vote, a national network of everyday people on who watch out for problems on Election Day. The project helps people report things they see when voting and also document incidents that occur in their area. Started in 2006, Video the Vote volunteers have helped raise national awareness of voting problems by recording over 1,000 videos that have been broadcast on networks like CBS, CNN, and ABC and viewed over 1 million times online.

It’s essential that voter suppression problems get reported right away and that their full story is told by the media on Election Day. Video the Vote urgently needs more volunteers, so if you want to help protect the right to vote, join today and tell your friends about the program as well.

And one last thing. Did you know that thousands of people didn’t cast in 2008 because they didn’t know where to vote? Luckily, for the first time in American history, every voter can now look up their polling place. All you have to do is enter your address to find out which polling station is yours. And make sure to share this handy tool with your friends through Facebook and Twitter.

Happy voting!

Learn. Share. Act. Go to restorefairness.org

 

 

 

Twitter and the Cowardice of Sarah Palin

Originally posted at Cagle.

When I joined Twitter in July 2006 I was the 3,365th person to sign up for the 140-character message streaming social network. Now, with more than 190 million users having taken the plunge, I guess you could call me an early adopter of sorts.

See, I've always believed that the Internet -- and by extension new online tools like Twitter -- have the ability to create change because it levels the political playing field tearing down walls that have traditionally separated the powerless and the powerful.

It turns out I may have been wrong -- at least when it comes to a certain half-termer from Alaska.

There's more...

CRUSH: Facebook Nation

It's the return of CRUSH! After taking a short summer hiatus, we're back in action, crushing the week's social media news into a juicy 3 minutes or less. And this week we're even giving you a special behind-the-scenes look into Crush Studios, so don't forget to join us on Facebook and Twitter.

The newest and third-largest nation in the world - Facebook Nation - is having trouble getting its currency off the ground. Facebook's announcement that Facebook credits will soon be the sole currency for all apps and games, has some of its 500,000 million citizens (i.e. developers) putting up a fight.

But Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg better start focusing on national security because other forces are preparing to attack. A web designer has filed a lawsuit against the social networking site claiming that, based on a contract entered in 2003 with Zuckerberg, he is entitled to 84% of Facebook, or $12.6 billion. And a Judge in New York has ruled to freeze the social networking site's assets until the case is resolved.

So Mr. Zuckerberg, how would you like to pay for that? Cash, credit, check or...Facebook credits?

In this week's quick hits:

  • Ebay has it's own legal woes, facing a copyright infringement lawsuit over PayPal technology that could cost them almost $4 billion.
  • Tweet Deck surpassed 15 million downloads this week, meaning that apparently more than 15 million people have yet to hear of Hootsuite.
  • And just when you thought Chatroulette couldn't get any creepier...it has now added a local feature, so you can now tell just how close that person (or body part) really is.

And in world news, China's online population has skyrocketed to "420 million as more people access the Internet with cell phones." The Communist government has renewed Google's operating license, ending the months-long stalemate over Internet censorship and providing momentum for rights groups, such as Human Rights First, in their effort to create an open Internet behind the Great Chinese Firewall.

And that brings us to our "Crush of the Week" where we would like to recognize the brilliant folks over at Old Spice for their new, creative social media marketing campaign that is both entertaining and effective.

 

The Use of Twitter in Times of Crisis

I was once a skeptic of Twitter.  It didn't seem to serve a very beneficial purpose to me, and I didn't find it to be as good of a social networking tool as Facebook.  I registered for a Twitter account, mostly out of spite, to see if I would like it or could find use of it.  This particular account was dormant for the better part of a year.

Twitter made news headlines a lot after the Iranian presidential election in 2009, where a base of protesters rallied support when many other media outlets/communication was blocked.  I was still a skeptic of twitter even after this, although I certainly saw its merits.

Then came the Upper Big Branch Mine Disaster.  I stumbled upon twitter a day or so before because an op-ed I wrote was retweeted by someone, so I decided to log on to see if I could get wrapped up in the cocaine-like twitter phenomenon.  

Once the mine disaster had occurred, I tuned into the Rachel Maddow Show to see Charleston Gazette Veteran Reporter Ken Ward Jr. being interviewed.  At the end of the interview it was mentioned that the public watching could follow Ken Ward for mine updates on twitter as they were developing.  I did just so.  

Literally every 15-20 minutes Ken Ward would update via twitter the continuing news of the disaster, keeping myself as well as many others informed well before any news outlet could.  In times of crisis, this type of information is of great importance.  When people needed to hear news of the developing aftermath, they would refer to twitter instead of other news sources because Ward was reporting right from the source.  
(as a side-note, I cannot commend Ken Ward Jr. enough for the up-to-date information at ground zero of the mine disaster.  Incredible reporting and truly an asset for the concerned and distraught members of the state of West Virginia who wanted to stay informed as much as possible

Though still not a double-digit tweet a day twitter junkie, I have started to use it more and have seen firsthand the use it offers in times of crisis.  Social-networking has become truly a revolutionary tool in politics and emergencies, as well as many other situations and outlets.

Just some food for thought.

 

 

The Use of Twitter in Times of Crisis

I was once a skeptic of Twitter.  It didn't seem to serve a very beneficial purpose to me, and I didn't find it to be as good of a social networking tool as Facebook.  I registered for a Twitter account, mostly out of spite, to see if I would like it or could find use of it.  This particular account was dormant for the better part of a year.

Twitter made news headlines a lot after the Iranian presidential election in 2009, where a base of protesters rallied support when many other media outlets/communication was blocked.  I was still a skeptic of twitter even after this, although I certainly saw its merits.

Then came the Upper Big Branch Mine Disaster.  I stumbled upon twitter a day or so before because an op-ed I wrote was retweeted by someone, so I decided to log on to see if I could get wrapped up in the cocaine-like twitter phenomenon.  

Once the mine disaster had occurred, I tuned into the Rachel Maddow Show to see Charleston Gazette Veteran Reporter Ken Ward Jr. being interviewed.  At the end of the interview it was mentioned that the public watching could follow Ken Ward for mine updates on twitter as they were developing.  I did just so.  

Literally every 15-20 minutes Ken Ward would update via twitter the continuing news of the disaster, keeping myself as well as many others informed well before any news outlet could.  In times of crisis, this type of information is of great importance.  When people needed to hear news of the developing aftermath, they would refer to twitter instead of other news sources because Ward was reporting right from the source.  
(as a side-note, I cannot commend Ken Ward Jr. enough for the up-to-date information at ground zero of the mine disaster.  Incredible reporting and truly an asset for the concerned and distraught members of the state of West Virginia who wanted to stay informed as much as possible

Though still not a double-digit tweet a day twitter junkie, I have started to use it more and have seen firsthand the use it offers in times of crisis.  Social-networking has become truly a revolutionary tool in politics and emergencies, as well as many other situations and outlets.

Just some food for thought.

 

 

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