A Proposal to Redistrict California: San Diego

This is the last part of a proposal outlining one possible way to redistrict California.

This post will concentrate on the San Diego region, part of Southern California.

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San Diego

The population of San Diego is enough to support a bit more than four congressional districts.

CA-50 (Powder Blue):

Population – 57.1% white, 1.8% black, 27.5% Hispanic, 10.2% Asian, 0.3% Native American, 3.1% other

The communities north of the city San Diego proper are placed in CA-50. Both the beachside cities and inland areas are relatively wealthy, the inland a bit less so. Perhaps the greatest weakness with this district is that it doesn’t include Oceanside, which has enormous commonality with the coastal cities in the district.

CA-51 (Saddle Brown):

Population – 16.5% white, 8.5% black, 57.4% Hispanic, 14.6% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 2.7% other

Over-18 Population – 19.8% white, 52.9% Hispanic

CA-51 is the VRA district in San Diego, drawn to be Hispanic controlled. The city Chula Vista anchors the district, which is located on the Mexican border – next to the much larger Mexican city Tijuana.

CA-52 (Olive Drab):

Population – 64.6% white, 4.3% black, 19.8% Hispanic, 6.9% Asian, 0.8% Native American, 3.7% other

This district looks big, covering much more space than the other three districts combined. Don’t be fooled, however – most of that area is empty mountains and desert. The inland suburbs of San Diego are where the people actually live .

CA-52 (Gainsboro/White):

Population – 53.8% white, 4.8% black, 22.8% Hispanic, 14.5% Asian, 0.3% Native American, 3.6% other

This is basically San Diego city itself.

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Final Thoughts

As with Orange County, San Diego is easy to redistrict. The only flaw in this map is that Oceanside isn’t in CD-50, which it should be.

In general, the San Diego area has a strong division between coastal communities and more inland communities. Here there are two coastal-based districts (CA-51 and 53), one inland-based district (CA-52), and one coastal/inland hybrid (CA-50). It would be interesting to see a map with two purely inland congressional districts, although perhaps the population just isn’t there to do that.

And that’s all of California, folks.

--Inoljt

 

A Proposal to Redistrict California: Orange County

This is part of a proposal outlining one possible way to redistrict California.

This post will concentrate on Orange County.

Orange County

The population of Orange County is enough to support a bit more than four congressional districts.

CA-40 (Firebrick):

Population – 30.1% white, 2.1% black, 35.5% Hispanic, 29.9% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 2.3% other

Over-18 Population – 33.9% White, 31.0% Hispanic, 31.0% Asian

Majority-Minority District

This district takes in the Orange County suburbs closest to Los Angeles. These suburbs can be characterized as quite diverse, moderately conservative, and well-off but not quite rich.

CA-46 (Tomato, located along the shore):

Population – 63.7% white, 1.1% black, 17.1% Hispanic, 14.7% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 3.3% other

This district unites the coastal communities of Orange County. Demographically and politically, the district fits well with the stereotype of Orange County as a place full of wealthy white conservative suburban warriors.

CA-47 (Thistle):

Population – 19.2% white, 1.3% black, 65.8% Hispanic, 12.2% Asian, 1.3% Native American, 1.3% other

Over-18 Population – 23.2% White, 60.1% Hispanic

Majority-Minority District; Majority-Hispanic

If CA-46 fits the Orange County stereotype to a glove, then CA-47 runs counter to it in almost every way. Anchored by Anaheim and Santa Ana, the district is (drawn to be) strongly Hispanic, poorer than the rest of Orange County (although certainly richer than downtown Los Angeles), and not very conservative.

CA-48 (Sandy Brown, located in the center-right of the map):

Population – 56.8% white, 1.5% black, 21.0% Hispanic, 17.2% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 3.3% other

CA-48 takes in the inland suburbs of Orange County. Most of the people actually live in the northeastern part; west of Irvine the population density is much less.

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Orange County is quite simple to draw; there are no conflicts between the VRA and communities of interest that one encounters elsewhere. The next post will take a look at the Inland Empire, part of the overall Southern California area.

--Inoljt

 

A Proposal to Redistrict California: Orange County

This is part of a proposal outlining one possible way to redistrict California.

This post will concentrate on Orange County.

Orange County

The population of Orange County is enough to support a bit more than four congressional districts.

CA-40 (Firebrick):

Population – 30.1% white, 2.1% black, 35.5% Hispanic, 29.9% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 2.3% other

Over-18 Population – 33.9% White, 31.0% Hispanic, 31.0% Asian

Majority-Minority District

This district takes in the Orange County suburbs closest to Los Angeles. These suburbs can be characterized as quite diverse, moderately conservative, and well-off but not quite rich.

CA-46 (Tomato, located along the shore):

Population – 63.7% white, 1.1% black, 17.1% Hispanic, 14.7% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 3.3% other

This district unites the coastal communities of Orange County. Demographically and politically, the district fits well with the stereotype of Orange County as a place full of wealthy white conservative suburban warriors.

CA-47 (Thistle):

Population – 19.2% white, 1.3% black, 65.8% Hispanic, 12.2% Asian, 1.3% Native American, 1.3% other

Over-18 Population – 23.2% White, 60.1% Hispanic

Majority-Minority District; Majority-Hispanic

If CA-46 fits the Orange County stereotype to a glove, then CA-47 runs counter to it in almost every way. Anchored by Anaheim and Santa Ana, the district is (drawn to be) strongly Hispanic, poorer than the rest of Orange County (although certainly richer than downtown Los Angeles), and not very conservative.

CA-48 (Sandy Brown, located in the center-right of the map):

Population – 56.8% white, 1.5% black, 21.0% Hispanic, 17.2% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 3.3% other

CA-48 takes in the inland suburbs of Orange County. Most of the people actually live in the northeastern part; west of Irvine the population density is much less.

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Orange County is quite simple to draw; there are no conflicts between the VRA and communities of interest that one encounters elsewhere. The next post will take a look at the Inland Empire, part of the overall Southern California area.

--Inoljt

 

A Proposal to Redistrict California: Orange County

This is part of a proposal outlining one possible way to redistrict California.

This post will concentrate on Orange County.

Orange County

The population of Orange County is enough to support a bit more than four congressional districts.

CA-40 (Firebrick):

Population – 30.1% white, 2.1% black, 35.5% Hispanic, 29.9% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 2.3% other

Over-18 Population – 33.9% White, 31.0% Hispanic, 31.0% Asian

Majority-Minority District

This district takes in the Orange County suburbs closest to Los Angeles. These suburbs can be characterized as quite diverse, moderately conservative, and well-off but not quite rich.

CA-46 (Tomato, located along the shore):

Population – 63.7% white, 1.1% black, 17.1% Hispanic, 14.7% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 3.3% other

This district unites the coastal communities of Orange County. Demographically and politically, the district fits well with the stereotype of Orange County as a place full of wealthy white conservative suburban warriors.

CA-47 (Thistle):

Population – 19.2% white, 1.3% black, 65.8% Hispanic, 12.2% Asian, 1.3% Native American, 1.3% other

Over-18 Population – 23.2% White, 60.1% Hispanic

Majority-Minority District; Majority-Hispanic

If CA-46 fits the Orange County stereotype to a glove, then CA-47 runs counter to it in almost every way. Anchored by Anaheim and Santa Ana, the district is (drawn to be) strongly Hispanic, poorer than the rest of Orange County (although certainly richer than downtown Los Angeles), and not very conservative.

CA-48 (Sandy Brown, located in the center-right of the map):

Population – 56.8% white, 1.5% black, 21.0% Hispanic, 17.2% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 3.3% other

CA-48 takes in the inland suburbs of Orange County. Most of the people actually live in the northeastern part; west of Irvine the population density is much less.

.

Orange County is quite simple to draw; there are no conflicts between the VRA and communities of interest that one encounters elsewhere. The next post will take a look at the Inland Empire, part of the overall Southern California area.

--Inoljt

 

Daily Insults Work

I am down. This is a downer diary.  I am also so far over the hill I won't even tell you how old I am. But based on that you can bet I know this blogosphere is not my world.

But stupidly, I guess, inspired by Hillary and  with time on my hands while taking care of an 88-year-old Mom with alzheimers--smack dab in the middle of  a right-wing militia neighborhood in southern california-- I decided to Blog!

Woohoo for me.

I began by finding the democratic blogs. And dailykos seemed like the Big Daddy. That last word is the right one. Sexism is alive and well in the blogosphere. It ain't that women don't blog there, they do, but they don't count. Don't tell me how I know this. I just did after my first week.

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