What’s Behind Romney’s Sincerity Problem

 

In a previous post, I wrote about a very revealing video of Mitt Romney. This video was filmed without Romney’s knowledge during an off-the-air conversation. In it, Romney talks sincerely and frankly in a way which we do not normally see him.

Here’s the video.

The first half of the video has the combative radio host asking Romney a series of tough questions. The second half has Romney speaking off-the-air, mostly about his church. My previous post talks a lot about this.

Aside from the religious discussion, there is another particular and very revealing thing that Romney says. It’s at the point 17:04 of the video. Here’s the transcript:

Jan Mickelson: …I take this stuff really seriously.

Mitt Romney: Oh I don’t though. For me it, this is all frivolous. *laughter* Oh come on, come on, I’m running for president…

This is a very interesting thing that Romney says, and it’s especially interesting given the way he laughs when he says it and his body language.

What Romney’s implying is that all “this stuff” – all the campaigning, all the television and radio interviews – is “frivolous.” It’s just a bunch of stupid stuff that he has to do in order to become president. It doesn’t really matter.

Now, Mitt Romney has a very big image problem. His critics accuse him of being willing to say and do whatever it takes to become president. Democrats say that Romney will flip-flop on any issue as long as it benefits him. This problem has deeply hurt Romney; it is a big reason why he lost the 2008 Republican primaries and why he’s taking so long to shake off the opposition right now.

There are a number of reasons why Romney has this problem. But one of the big reasons, and one of the most subtle of them, is illustrated in the quote above. That is, Romney’s attitude towards campaigning is a big reason why people don’t think he’s sincere. To Romney, campaigning is just a bunch of bullshit that he has to endure in order to win election. When you get down to it, that’s what means when he says “this is all frivolous.”

And it’s not the first time Romney has said this. Remember when Romney was accused of hiring undocumented immigrants? Here’s what he said in defense of himself:

So we went to the company and we said, look, you can’t have any illegals working on our property. I’m running for office, for Pete’s sake, I can’t have illegals. It turns out that once question, they hired someone who had falsified their documents, had documents, and therefore we fired them.

Of course, this is a terrible attitude to have. Voters are not stupid. They can tell things like that very quickly. People are very good at intuiting what a person feels. If a candidate thinks that campaigning is dumb, they notice. Romney has that attitude. Unsurprisingly, he’s now developed a reputation of being insincere and a flip-flopper.

 

 

Mitt Romney’s Fake Love For Michigan

 

Say somebody is complimenting you. How do you know whether they’re being honest, or whether they’re just saying the same thing that they say to everybody?

Well, one good way is to see how unique the compliment is. Are you the only person who fits the description? Or does everybody else?

Mitt Romney has recently been making the rounds praising Japan to the sky. Here’s why Romney loves Japan:

I love this country. It seems right here. The trees are the right height. I like seeing the lakes. I love the lakes. There’s something very special here.  The great lakes, but also all the inland lakes that dot the parts of Japan. I love cars. I dunno, I mean I grew up totally in love with cars. It used to be in the fifties and sixties if you showed me one square foot of almost any part of a car I could tell you what brand it was, the model and so forth. Now with all the other cars I’m not quite so good at it. But I still know the Japanese cars pretty well. And, uh, drive a Lexus. I love cars. I love Japanese cars. And long may they rule the world.

Mitt Romney, it seems, loves Japan because the trees there are just the right height. I’ve never seen a Japanese tree in person before, but I guess that there’s just something special about them. Here’s the video.

Oops. Looks like Romney wasn’t talking about Japan after all – he was talking about Michigan.

Yet if you change just five words in his speech (state, Michigan, Japanese, Mustang, American), Romney could be talking about any place in the world.

It doesn’t seem like Mitt Romney’s love for Michigan is very sincere.

 

 

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