Imagine if We Never Ended the War on Alcohol

Remember we did have a War on Alcohol. It was called Prohibition. In fact, we took that far more seriously than our War on Drugs. We even passed a constituional amendment about it. Of course, the gigantic difference is that we realized that was a mistake and reversed course.

These days it doesn't seem politically possible to ever change course. If you start a war, the only acceptable answer is to escalate it. We can never surrender, even if we should. So, our War on Drugs must go on forever, no matter how futile, no matter how terrible the results and no matter how counterproductive. It would be weak to ever admit we made a mistake.

Over the last two years we spent $1.6 billion on the Merida Project, where we asked the Mexican government to escalate their War on Drugs. The result? Over the last three years, nearly 25,000 Mexicans have been killed in the drug wars. This is madness. The amount of drugs entering our country is not appreciably different. We lost, drugs won.

But the crime and the horrific drug violence are not related to drug users; they're related to drug dealers. It's the prohibition itself that is causing this crime wave. Just like it did during alcohol prohibition, when Al Capone and all the mobsters reigned supreme here. When are we ever going to learn our lesson? We keep spending insane amounts of money on wars that cannot be won.

Like the War on Terror. Who declares war on a tactic? How do you win that war? Until all of the "terrorists" are dead? Which ones? Until everyone promises not to use that tactic anymore? The reality is it's an excuse to spend huge amounts of money on an endless project that will profit the defense industry for decades to come.

But there was one war we decided to give up on -- the War on Alcohol. And thank God we did! Could you imagine if we were still fighting that battle? If they had passed that law, let alone the amendment, these days, we would never reverse position because it would seem unmanly. So, we would be stuck fighting a useless and wildly counterproductive war on a perfectly fine recreational habit. Kind of like we do now with marijuana.

We have to recognize when something isn't working. The Cuban embargo isn't about to breakthrough in its fiftieth year. It didn't work. Let it go. The Castros still run Cuba and it's way past time to try a new approach. It doesn't mean we have to embrace the Cuban government, it just means we have to try something new to tackle the problem.

The same is true of the so-called War on Drugs. If it really was a war, we lost. It turns out people still want to get high, no matter how hard we try to stop them.

We have to end this stupid, senseless war. It's killing us, literally.

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Imagine if We Never Ended the War on Alcohol

Remember we did have a War on Alcohol. It was called Prohibition. In fact, we took that far more seriously than our War on Drugs. We even passed a constituional amendment about it. Of course, the gigantic difference is that we realized that was a mistake and reversed course.

These days it doesn't seem politically possible to ever change course. If you start a war, the only acceptable answer is to escalate it. We can never surrender, even if we should. So, our War on Drugs must go on forever, no matter how futile, no matter how terrible the results and no matter how counterproductive. It would be weak to ever admit we made a mistake.

Over the last two years we spent $1.6 billion on the Merida Project, where we asked the Mexican government to escalate their War on Drugs. The result? Over the last three years, nearly 25,000 Mexicans have been killed in the drug wars. This is madness. The amount of drugs entering our country is not appreciably different. We lost, drugs won.

But the crime and the horrific drug violence are not related to drug users; they're related to drug dealers. It's the prohibition itself that is causing this crime wave. Just like it did during alcohol prohibition, when Al Capone and all the mobsters reigned supreme here. When are we ever going to learn our lesson? We keep spending insane amounts of money on wars that cannot be won.

Like the War on Terror. Who declares war on a tactic? How do you win that war? Until all of the "terrorists" are dead? Which ones? Until everyone promises not to use that tactic anymore? The reality is it's an excuse to spend huge amounts of money on an endless project that will profit the defense industry for decades to come.

But there was one war we decided to give up on -- the War on Alcohol. And thank God we did! Could you imagine if we were still fighting that battle? If they had passed that law, let alone the amendment, these days, we would never reverse position because it would seem unmanly. So, we would be stuck fighting a useless and wildly counterproductive war on a perfectly fine recreational habit. Kind of like we do now with marijuana.

We have to recognize when something isn't working. The Cuban embargo isn't about to breakthrough in its fiftieth year. It didn't work. Let it go. The Castros still run Cuba and it's way past time to try a new approach. It doesn't mean we have to embrace the Cuban government, it just means we have to try something new to tackle the problem.

The same is true of the so-called War on Drugs. If it really was a war, we lost. It turns out people still want to get high, no matter how hard we try to stop them.

We have to end this stupid, senseless war. It's killing us, literally.

Watch The Young Turks Here

Follow Cenk Uygur on Twitter: www.twitter.com/TheYoungTurks
Become a Fan of The Young Turks on Facebook: www.facebook.com/tytnation

 

 

California Democratic Party Content to Lose in November

UPDATE: The fix was in, the vote wasn't even close. Sad day for California Democrats who value winning.

California is beyond crisis. Yet unfortunately, there has not been an appropriate effort by the California Democratic Party establishment to respond. The complete and total failure to respond to the budget crisis was malpractice, but now it seems the CDP doesn't even want to bother trying to win in November. The issue in question is California's Proposition 19, to tax and regulate marijuana, which has become the latest test of whether the CDP wants to win elections. A vote today by the state party Resolutions Committee showed the fix to be in against incorporating all of the new energy around Prop 19 into Democrats' GOTV program. When it came down to trying to win, or trying to be "very serious people" who are content to lose, they decided they value propping up Mexican drug cartels more than they value electing Jerry Brown.

There's more...

The Return Of Eliot Spitzer? Not Yet, But Possibly in the Future?

As we are probably familiar with, the former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer resigned from his position in March 2008 after the press emerged with federal wiretappings that incriminated Spitzer (who was arranging to meet a prostitute in Washington).  Since then, Eliot Spitzer has been playing damage control. He's a regular columnist for Slate, and has appeared on show's like Real Time with Bill Maher to discuss matters of Wall Street, taxation, and a Maher favorite... the legalization of marijuana. What I found most impressive is that he is still married. This is what the Washington Post had to say (via Reuters):

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A majority of New York voters do not want disgraced former Governor Eliot Spitzer to run for statewide office this year, but many say that they would support a run in the future, a poll said on Wednesday.

Asked "Should Eliot Spitzer ever run for public office in New York again, or not?," 45 percent said Spitzer, thought by many to be engineering a political comeback, should run for office some day, said the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion survey.

But 48 percent said his political career is over. The survey did not address how New Yorkers would vote if he did run.

Is there a possibility of Spitzer making a public office run, and being elected, in the future?  The chances seem slim now, but nothing is out of the realm of possibility it seems.

The Return Of Eliot Spitzer? Not Yet, But Possibly in the Future?

As we are probably familiar with, the former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer resigned from his position in March 2008 after the press emerged with federal wiretappings that incriminated Spitzer (who was arranging to meet a prostitute in Washington).  Since then, Eliot Spitzer has been playing damage control. He's a regular columnist for Slate, and has appeared on show's like Real Time with Bill Maher to discuss matters of Wall Street, taxation, and a Maher favorite... the legalization of marijuana. What I found most impressive is that he is still married. This is what the Washington Post had to say (via Reuters):

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A majority of New York voters do not want disgraced former Governor Eliot Spitzer to run for statewide office this year, but many say that they would support a run in the future, a poll said on Wednesday.

Asked "Should Eliot Spitzer ever run for public office in New York again, or not?," 45 percent said Spitzer, thought by many to be engineering a political comeback, should run for office some day, said the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion survey.

But 48 percent said his political career is over. The survey did not address how New Yorkers would vote if he did run.

Is there a possibility of Spitzer making a public office run, and being elected, in the future?  The chances seem slim now, but nothing is out of the realm of possibility it seems.

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