Which 08 Candidate Gets the Power of Soccer?

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No, this isn't a pop quiz. It's the second in my rather faltering series of thoughts on "globalization from the road," this time from Kerala, in South India. As you know, NDN is keen on soccer, having run some tremendous campaigns using the sport to connect with the hispanic committee. But, that isn't all that the beautiful game has to teach the Democratic presidential hopefuls.

I haven't actually read Frank Foer's book on soccer and globalization. I should have, but there you go. Everyone says it is very good, and I apologise in advance if I'm making the same points he does. But I have been ceaselessly struck on my travels by the power of soccer. And not just any type of soccer, neither. It doesn't matter if it is Malaysian billboard or Thailand metro adverts; Singaporean cable or New Zealand radio; or even the sports pages of cricket crazy India. The world is watching not any old soccer; the world is watching English Soccer. If I were to guesstimate, I would say that the English Premiership has roughly 90% market share in these fast-growing Asian markets, with Spain somewhere around 10%, and the rest absolutely nowhere. That isn't just a result. Its a drubbing.

Now, before you think "smarmy brit bragging about his country's only half decent export", there is a political point to this. And it is wonderfully encapsulated in this quote found in Niall Fergusons book Empire, about the decline of British imperial power. Ferguson quotes Sir Richard Turnbull, the penultimate governor of the British protectorate of Aden (now Yemen, who said, rather perceptively, that:

"When the British Empire finally sinks beneath the waves it will leave only two monuments: the game of Association Football, and the expression "f*ck off."

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Globalization from the Ground Up - Republicans wrong on IP policy

Having formally left NDN at the end of last year, I am now travelling round Asia for a while before returning home to Britain. And, well, given I used to work with Rob on the Globalization initiative, I thought I'd offer a few occasional thoughts on globalization from the ground. This is the first of these, and hopefully not the last. For what its worth, this is posted from Bombay, India.

NDN rightly raises the issue of IP protection, and the problem of its constant flouting in developing countries. The problem here is simple. It is not in the long-term interest of developing countries to flout IP regimes. But, crucially, it is definitely in their short term interests. China does not want to pay for copies of Windows Vista, even if it understands in the long-run that growth is positively correlated with respecting IP rights. The trick, then, is what strategy should the rights holding countries (US, EU and Japan) prosecute to try and get the rights abusing countries (India, China, others in Asia, Brazil, etc) to get to the point in their development when they see that protecting IP is in their immediate interests. This point is roughly where Singapore is You know this because it is impossible to find counterfeit good in Singapore, while they are abundant - almost comically so - in neighbouring Malaysia, and Thailand. And, of course, in China.

And this is where it gets interesting. Because at the moment the US is following the wrong strategy. It is demanding that the developing countries just stop it: obey the rules, and get with the programme. This is clearly not going to work, as the US and its IP-holding allies have no powers of enforcement. Instead, it is clear that different strategies need to be followed for different regions. And here is the interesting thing: the private sector really gets this, even if the government doesn't.

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Thinking Hard About the Trade Deficit

George Bush has managed to set another record - Our trade deficit hit a record high in 2006 of $763.6 billion. That's up about 7 percent from the previous year and up 25 percent from 2004. The country's 2006 deficit in manufactured goods was actually $836 billion, but some of that was offset by a $72.5 billion surplus in services.

A number like $836 billion, especially written in red ink, can be daunting, so let's take it apart and see in what exact ways it matters. It's certainly not good for the overall economy to purchase $836 billion more in goods from other countries than we sell to other countries, but it's also not necessarily bad. It's hard to posit that it reflects a collapse in the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturing companies, since manufacturing accounts for about the share of our GDP as it did 20 years ago, and America's global market share in manufacturing actually rose over the last 10 years from 20 to 22 percent - while Europe and Japan's global market shares feel sharply. And our companies' global market share in high-tech manufacturing went up even more. The critical issue here is that we measure trade flows by the value of what passes across our border in either direction, and American manufacturers are more highly globalized than Europe's. So one-third or more of our manufacturing imports are actually shipments from the foreign subsidiaries and affiliates of U.S. manufacturers.

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Industrial Society Destroys Mind and Environment

The link between Mind and Social / Environmental-Issues.

The fast-paced, consumerist lifestyle of Industrial Society is causing exponential rise in psychological problems besides destroying the environment. All issues are interlinked. Our Minds cannot be peaceful when attention-spans are down to nanoseconds, microseconds and milliseconds. Our Minds cannot be peaceful if we destroy Nature.

Industrial Society Destroys Mind and Environment.

Subject : In a fast society slow emotions become extinct.
Subject : A thinking mind cannot feel.
Subject : Scientific/ Industrial/ Financial thinking destroys the planet.
Subject : Environment can never be saved as long as cities exist.

Emotion is what we experience during gaps in our thinking.

If there are no gaps there is no emotion.

Today people are thinking all the time and are mistaking thought (words/ language) for emotion.

When society switches-over from physical work (agriculture) to mental work (scientific/ industrial/ financial/ fast visuals/ fast words ) the speed of thinking keeps on accelerating and the gaps between thinking go on decreasing.

There comes a time when there are almost no gaps.

People become incapable of experiencing/ tolerating gaps.

Emotion ends.

Man becomes machine.

A society that speeds up mentally experiences every mental slowing-down as Depression / Anxiety.

A ( travelling )society that speeds up physically experiences every physical slowing-down as Depression / Anxiety.

A society that entertains itself daily experiences every non-entertaining moment as Depression / Anxiety.

FAST VISUALS WORDS MAKE SLOW EMOTIONS EXTINCT.

SCIENTIFIC /INDUSTRIAL /FINANCIAL THINKING DESTROYS EMOTIONAL CIRCUITS.

A FAST (LARGE) SOCIETY CANNOT FEEL PAIN / REMORSE / EMPATHY.

A FAST (LARGE) SOCIETY WILL ALWAYS BE CRUEL TO ANIMALS TREES/ AIR/ WATER/ LAND AND TO ITSELF.

To read the complete article please follow either of these links :

PlanetSave

EarthNewsWire

sushil_yadav

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Pay Cuts for EU Engineers

Reliable information has come out about engineers in a European Union country taking pay cuts in order to keep their jobs and "some" of the company's manufacturing lines and factories inside the EU.

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