GOP Follows Dem Lead, Recommends 2012 Primary Season Start In March

Following the lead of the Democratic Change Commission, the Republicans' Temporary Delegate Selection Committee recommended Tuesday that no state hold their presidential nominating contest prior to the first Tuesday in March, 2012 [Smith, Ben (2010-5-11).  Early states prevailPolitico.  Retrieved on 2010-5-12.].

Nineteen states, according to research done by Josh Putnam at Frontloading HQ, would have to move their primaries or caucuses back to the first Tuesday in March or face sanctions by the Democratic and Republican national committees. 

The small states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina --four states whose combined electoral votes are less than 5% of the total electoral college-- continue to maintain their preferential status.  Except that their presidential nominating contests must not be held any earlier than February 1, 2012.

The recommendations of both the Democratic Change Commission and the RNC Temporary Delegate Selection Committee still have to be approved by each respective national party committee.  Expect a slew of legislation from states moving their primary or caucus back after the DNC and RNC signs off on the new calendar.

Looking ahead, the Democratic and Republican national committees are finalizing the delegate selection rules for 2012.  Once those rules are adopted later this summer,  they will be forwarded to the states for use in formulating their delegate selection plans.  The states will then adopt their delegate selection plans in the summer of 2011.

GOP Follows Dem Lead, Recommends 2012 Primary Season Start In March

Following the lead of the Democratic Change Commission, the Republicans' Temporary Delegate Selection Committee recommended Tuesday that no state hold their presidential nominating contest prior to the first Tuesday in March, 2012 [Smith, Ben (2010-5-11).  Early states prevailPolitico.  Retrieved on 2010-5-12.].

Nineteen states, according to research done by Josh Putnam at Frontloading HQ, would have to move their primaries or caucuses back to the first Tuesday in March or face sanctions by the Democratic and Republican national committees. 

The small states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina --four states whose combined electoral votes are less than 5% of the total electoral college-- continue to maintain their preferential status.  Except that their presidential nominating contests must not be held any earlier than February 1, 2012.

The recommendations of both the Democratic Change Commission and the RNC Temporary Delegate Selection Committee still have to be approved by each respective national party committee.  Expect a slew of legislation from states moving their primary or caucus back after the DNC and RNC signs off on the new calendar.

Looking ahead, the Democratic and Republican national committees are finalizing the delegate selection rules for 2012.  Once those rules are adopted later this summer,  they will be forwarded to the states for use in formulating their delegate selection plans.  The states will then adopt their delegate selection plans in the summer of 2011.

GOP Follows Dem Lead, Recommends 2012 Primary Season Start In March

Following the lead of the Democratic Change Commission, the Republicans' Temporary Delegate Selection Committee recommended Tuesday that no state hold their presidential nominating contest prior to the first Tuesday in March, 2012 [Smith, Ben (2010-5-11).  Early states prevailPolitico.  Retrieved on 2010-5-12.].

Nineteen states, according to research done by Josh Putnam at Frontloading HQ, would have to move their primaries or caucuses back to the first Tuesday in March or face sanctions by the Democratic and Republican national committees. 

The small states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina --four states whose combined electoral votes are less than 5% of the total electoral college-- continue to maintain their preferential status.  Except that their presidential nominating contests must not be held any earlier than February 1, 2012.

The recommendations of both the Democratic Change Commission and the RNC Temporary Delegate Selection Committee still have to be approved by each respective national party committee.  Expect a slew of legislation from states moving their primary or caucus back after the DNC and RNC signs off on the new calendar.

Looking ahead, the Democratic and Republican national committees are finalizing the delegate selection rules for 2012.  Once those rules are adopted later this summer,  they will be forwarded to the states for use in formulating their delegate selection plans.  The states will then adopt their delegate selection plans in the summer of 2011.

GOP Follows Dem Lead, Recommends 2012 Primary Season Start In March

Following the lead of the Democratic Change Commission, the Republicans' Temporary Delegate Selection Committee recommended Tuesday that no state hold their presidential nominating contest prior to the first Tuesday in March, 2012 [Smith, Ben (2010-5-11).  Early states prevailPolitico.  Retrieved on 2010-5-12.].

Nineteen states, according to research done by Josh Putnam at Frontloading HQ, would have to move their primaries or caucuses back to the first Tuesday in March or face sanctions by the Democratic and Republican national committees. 

The small states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina --four states whose combined electoral votes are less than 5% of the total electoral college-- continue to maintain their preferential status.  Except that their presidential nominating contests must not be held any earlier than February 1, 2012.

The recommendations of both the Democratic Change Commission and the RNC Temporary Delegate Selection Committee still have to be approved by each respective national party committee.  Expect a slew of legislation from states moving their primary or caucus back after the DNC and RNC signs off on the new calendar.

Looking ahead, the Democratic and Republican national committees are finalizing the delegate selection rules for 2012.  Once those rules are adopted later this summer,  they will be forwarded to the states for use in formulating their delegate selection plans.  The states will then adopt their delegate selection plans in the summer of 2011.

The Obama Campaign Is Listening

Via calitics, David Plouffe sends e-mails:

There has been an extraordinary outpouring of grassroots support for Senator Obama among Democrats and Independents in all 53 California Congressional districts.

In recognition of this tremendous enthusiasm, our campaign has asked the California Democratic Party to allow all persons who have filed to be a district delegate candidate for Senator Obama at the Democratic National Convention to participate in the caucuses this Sunday, April 13, 2008.

We are confident that delegates elected from this pool will reflect the Senator's commitment to a diverse and unified delegation at the National Convention.

An overwhelming number of supporters have signed up to run for delegate, so there will likely be lines and tight space at the caucus locations. We ask for everyone's patience and cooperation.

Most of all, please enjoy this opportunity to meet other Obama supporters and elect delegate candidates to the Convention in Denver.

If you have any questions, please contact Daryl Sprague at dsprague@barackobama.com.

Thanks for your interest and active participation in Barack's campaign to change politics and change America.

David

The Obama campaign sent a really clear message today: "we are listening." This is how elected (and would be elected) officials are supposed to act when there's a public outcry about something. I've spoken to many Obama voters about why they are supporting him and one of the common threads is that they feel he'd be far more responsive to grassroots pressure than Hillary Clinton would be. I'm not sure if that's true but the events of today at least give me confidence that, while being president and running for president are two different things, as president Obama would be willing to change course if the public demanded it. That would be quite a change indeed.

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