CIA Misconduct in Peruvian Killing Underlines Inconsistencies--and Problems--in U.S. Policies

Talk about exquisite timing.

Two days ago, the New York Times reported on the just-released publication of a 2008 report on the CIA's negligence, deceit, disregard for its own rules and stonewalling in connection with investigation of its practice of shooting down airplanes in Peru in 2001. Back then, it was deadly mistakes made in the war on drugs.

A day later, the Wall Street Journal published a report about ramping up the CIA's targeted killing program in the war against terrorism (or against Al Qaida, as the Administration now calls it).

The Peru example underscores why the United States should not be using the CIA to conduct targeted killings. The CIA operates, understandably, in secret. When and if its conduct is investigated, the reports of its violations usually remain secret as well. The power to impose death should not be delegated to an entity, and to individuals, so shielded from standard measures of accountability.

There's more...

CIA Misconduct in Peruvian Killing Underlines Inconsistencies--and Problems--in U.S. Policies

Talk about exquisite timing.

Two days ago, the New York Times reported on the just-released publication of a 2008 report on the CIA's negligence, deceit, disregard for its own rules and stonewalling in connection with investigation of its practice of shooting down airplanes in Peru in 2001. Back then, it was deadly mistakes made in the war on drugs.

A day later, the Wall Street Journal published a report about ramping up the CIA's targeted killing program in the war against terrorism (or against Al Qaida, as the Administration now calls it).

The Peru example underscores why the United States should not be using the CIA to conduct targeted killings. The CIA operates, understandably, in secret. When and if its conduct is investigated, the reports of its violations usually remain secret as well. The power to impose death should not be delegated to an entity, and to individuals, so shielded from standard measures of accountability.

There's more...

One Leg Raised on the Bush-Cheney Legacy: Deconstructing the Spin and Propaganda

In an incisive 2,500 word analysis, award-winning journalist and university professor Walter Brasch reviews eight years of Republican spin and propaganda, all wrapped up in a letter sent by the Republican National Committee.

There's more...

Guantanamo: Obstructing Justice, When Justice Is Nowhere to be Found

When I was a freshman in college, I was given the once-in-an-American-lifetime chance of visiting Cuba on a cultural exchange tour with my choir. Between the art, the food and the music, I spent the entire week entranced by the vividness of Cuban life. But I will also never forget being invited into the home of a local Havana woman to take part in a Santeria ritual. I was touched by how the Cuban people could welcome Americans into their lives, while also despising the practices of our government.

The cloud that the U.S.'s maligned reputation had cast over our trip was especially palpable when we traveled around the city of Guantanamo. Here was a structure, a prison, which stood to represent American-branded justice, yet its very existence went against everything our country stood for: the right to a fair trial, the notion of innocent until proven guilty, and protection against cruel and unusual punishment.

There's more...

Diaries

Advertise Blogads