Talking Race at the Tea Party Convention

A unique challenge faces advocates for meaningful dialogue on racial inequality and injustice in America. As people of color have made even modest gains in education, economic security, and professional opportunities over the past few decades, some Americans have increasingly insisted that racial discrimination is largely a thing of the past. Today that sentiment is more widespread and vocal than ever, with the election of Barack Obama as the nation's 44th president.

A shocking example of remaining racial inequality took place at the first ever National Tea Party Convention. Former Representative from Colorado, Tom Tancredo decried "the cult of multiculturalism," and argued that President Obama was elected because "we do not have a civics, literacy test before people can vote in this country."

Mr. Tancredo had to know that literacy and civics voting tests with impossible answers were notoriously used to prevent African Americans from voting during segregation—and were banned by the Voting Rights Act of 1964.

There's more...

Talking Race at the Tea Party Convention

A unique challenge faces advocates for meaningful dialogue on racial inequality and injustice in America. As people of color have made even modest gains in education, economic security, and professional opportunities over the past few decades, some Americans have increasingly insisted that racial discrimination is largely a thing of the past. Today that sentiment is more widespread and vocal than ever, with the election of Barack Obama as the nation's 44th president.

A shocking example of remaining racial inequality took place at the first ever National Tea Party Convention. Former Representative from Colorado, Tom Tancredo decried "the cult of multiculturalism," and argued that President Obama was elected because "we do not have a civics, literacy test before people can vote in this country."

Mr. Tancredo had to know that literacy and civics voting tests with impossible answers were notoriously used to prevent African Americans from voting during segregation—and were banned by the Voting Rights Act of 1964.

There's more...

Hitchens: Karl Rove an Atheist

Cross posted at Democratic Courage blog.

According to ex-liberal neo-con Bush administration buddy Christopher Hitchens, Karl Rove is an atheist. Here's an excerpt from his interview with  New York magazine's Boris Kachka:

Has anyone in the Bush administration confided in you about being an atheist?
Well, I don't talk that much to them--maybe people think I do. I know something which is known to few but is not a secret. Karl Rove is not a believer, and he doesn't shout it from the rooftops, but when asked, he answers quite honestly. I think the way he puts it is, "I'm not fortunate enough to be a person of faith."

What must Bush make of that?
I think it's false to say that the president acts as if he believes he has God's instructions. Compared to Jimmy Carter, he's nowhere. He's a Methodist, having joined his wife's church in the end. He also claims that Jesus got him off the demon drink. He doesn't believe it. His wife said, "If you don't stop, I'm leaving and I'm taking the kids." You can say that you got help from Jesus if you want, but that's just a polite way of putting it in Texas.

There's more...

THANK YOU FROM BILL WINTER, CO-06

For sharp, insightful analysis--yeah right!--be sure to read this post all the way to the end--you might also (not) win a pony if you read all the way to the end!

I want to send out my most sincere and heartfelt thank you to all of you who voted for me in the first two rounds of Gov. Mark Warner's Map Changers contest. Because of you we just finished very strongly in the top five in the West from a list of very strong candidates. We will get a much needed $5,000 check from Gov. Warner's PAC as well as a chance to win the final round and bring Gov. Warner to Colorado.

There's more...

BILL WINTER, CO-06: "Cut and Run"--a coward's mantra!

By now I'm sure most of you have seen the email that made the national rounds in the last year that showed who among national leaders and pundits had actually served in the military. Naturally, the vast majority of those doing the most cheerleading for Bush's war of choice in Iraq had never served a day in the military, much less seen combat. Just as predictably, those on the Democrat side and speaking out against the war--and the way it has been fought--included a large preponderance of veterans.

I have watched with interest in recent weeks as Congressional and White House republicans desperately try to repair public confidence in their failed Iraq policies by endlessly repeating the worn out phrase "cut and run." What they don't seem to understand is that their policies and decisions have real word repercussions that affect real lives of real Americans.

There's more...

Diaries

Advertise Blogads