Barack Obama's Cover on Rolling Stone.

                                 

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Here are excepts from the Rolling Stone article:

The first thing I notice about the plane is how low-key it is, all coach seating from back (the press) to front (the candidate). There is no separate compartment for this potential president; he just holds down the second row for himself and his newspapers. There are no more than 10 staffers on the plane, and a dozen or more rows are empty, separating the senator from the Secret Service contingent and two dozen members of the traveling press corps. It's not a big day or a big event: The primaries are done, and none of the media big names are along.

The thing that is remarkable is that for a politician, Obama has graced the Rolling Stone cover twice within a year, but this time NO TYPE over the picture, just him.

Audio Clips from the Jann Wenner interview with Barack, here.

What is on his ipod?

"If I had one musical hero, it would have to be Stevie Wonder," says Obama, who grew up on Seventies R&B and rock staples including Earth, Wind and Fire, Elton John and the Rolling Stones. "When I was at that point where you start getting involved in music, Stevie had that run with Music of My Mind, Talking Book, Fulfillingness' First Finale and Innervisions, and then Songs in the Key of Life. Those are as brilliant a set of five albums as we've ever seen."

Wonder shares room on Obama's iPod with "everything from Howlin' Wolf to Yo-Yo Ma to Sheryl Crow," he says. "And I have probably 30 Dylan songs on my iPod." Though he's partial to 1975's Blood on the Tracks, "Maggie's Farm" is "one of my favorites during the political season," says Obama. "It speaks to me as I listen to some of the political rhetoric."

and a slide show...yeah, in that slide show mood...

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Tip the Obama Jar, Here
Get Involved Here
For Inspiration:  Yes.We.Can!!!

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icebergslim1047 (at) gmail (dot) com
cross-posted @This Week With Barack Obama

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The Great Iraq Swindle... If you do nothing else, read this article!

Matt Taibbi in Rolling Stone has written a thorough and maddening article on the billions of dollars that OUR OWN FELLOW CITIZENS have stolen from us as contractors in Iraq. And the government has not only done nothing about it, but has participated in the fraud and corruption.

I warn you that the language is sometimes rough, but YOU MUST READ THIS ARTICLE:

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/sto ry/16076312/the_great_iraq_swindle

And after you've read it ask yourself this: Now what am I going to do about it?

Under The LobsterScope

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Rolling Stone Mag: Taking Back Congress

Rolling Stone Magazine (10/19/06) has a very good article called Taking Back Congress.  The author, Tim Dickinson, highlights 10 key districts that could help Democrats win the majority. The districts highlighted are-- OH-15th, PA-7th, CT- 5th, NM-1st, CA-4th, IN-8th, NC-11th, AZ-5th, NY-24th, MN-6th.  Since I write about Ohio's 15th district, I was particularly interested in what Dickinson had to say about Republican Deborah Pryce and her challenger, Democrat Mary Jo Kilroy. (Dickinson says that Democrats have their best chance at winning the 15th since Pryce has been such a loyal Bush supporter and the 4th ranking Republican leader in the House.)

The article might be online later.  When you go to your local magazine rack, check out page 59 in the October 19th issue of Rolling Stone.

http://ohio15th.blogspot.com

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Amerikaz Most Wanted

Things are not going particularly well for President Obama. Not wanting to contribute to his troubles, I would like to offer one area where I would passionately defend of the president: the recent contretemps over his iPod. Like most controversies in the news, this is extremely late. People offended by Jay-Z and Lil Wayne’s place on the presidential iPod should know that Obama betrayed a love for rap some 2½ years ago. On the morning after a particularly bruising debate with Hillary Rodham Clinton, then-Sen. Obama met with a throng of supporters and flipped off Sen. Clinton, before brushing his shoulders off, a la Jay-Z.  

What do you think of rap? Has it been unfairly attacked for destroying family values?

By definition, rock & roll is rebel music, which means if it's not being criticized, it's probably not doing its job. I am troubled sometimes by the misogyny and materialism of a lot of rap lyrics, but I think the genius of the art form has shifted the culture and helped to desegregate music. Music was very segregated back in the Seventies and Eighties — you'll remember that when MTV first came on, it wasn't until Thriller that they played Michael.

I know Jay-Z. I know Ludacris. I know Russell Simmons. I know a bunch of these guys. They are great talents and great businessmen, which is something that doesn't get emphasized enough. It would be nice if I could have my daughters listen to their music without me worrying that they were getting bad images of themselves.

That was Barack Obama in Rolling Stone on June 25, 2008.

Obama came through as a thoughtful, mainstream listener of all kinds of music, including rap. While almost no one embraces the violent gangsterism of some rap, its more talented progenitors like Jay-Z, Tupac Shakur, Snoop, and even Lil Wayne, to a degree, are enthralling figures. In other words, they spit catchy stuff.

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Amerikaz Most Wanted

 

Things are not going particularly well for President Obama. Not wanting to contribute to his troubles, I would like to offer one area where I would passionately defend of the president: the recent contretemps over his iPod. Like most controversies in the news, this is extremely late. People offended by Jay-Z and Lil Wayne’s place on the presidential iPod should know that Obama betrayed a love for rap some 2½ years ago. On the morning after a particularly bruising debate with Hillary Rodham Clinton, then-Sen. Obama met with a throng of supporters and flipped off Sen. Clinton, before brushing his shoulders off, a la Jay-Z.  

What do you think of rap? Has it been unfairly attacked for destroying family values?

By definition, rock & roll is rebel music, which means if it's not being criticized, it's probably not doing its job. I am troubled sometimes by the misogyny and materialism of a lot of rap lyrics, but I think the genius of the art form has shifted the culture and helped to desegregate music. Music was very segregated back in the Seventies and Eighties — you'll remember that when MTV first came on, it wasn't until Thriller that they played Michael.

I know Jay-Z. I know Ludacris. I know Russell Simmons. I know a bunch of these guys. They are great talents and great businessmen, which is something that doesn't get emphasized enough. It would be nice if I could have my daughters listen to their music without me worrying that they were getting bad images of themselves.

That was Barack Obama in Rolling Stone on June 25, 2008.

Obama came through as a thoughtful, mainstream listener of all kinds of music, including rap. While almost no one embraces the violent gangsterism of some rap, its more talented progenitors like Jay-Z, Tupac Shakur, Snoop, and even Lil Wayne, to a degree, are enthralling figures. In other words, they spit catchy stuff.

There's more...

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