Connecticut, Minnesota and Colorado Results

Connecticut Primary Results
Dannel P. Malloy, the former mayor of Stamford, the state’s fourth-largest city, won the Democratic nomination for governor, defeating Ned Lamont, a multimillionaire businessman who gained national prominence four years ago for defeating Senator Joe Lieberman in the Democratic primary only to lose in the general election. While Lamont ran in 2006 on an anti-war progressive platform, he tacked to the center in this campaign. With 90 percent of the votes counted, Mr. Malloy had 58 percent and Mr. Lamont 42 percent. Mr. Malloy now faces Thomas Foley, who served as an ambassador to Ireland during the Bush years. Foley defeated Lt. Gov. Michael C. Fedele for the Republican nomination.

In the race to replace the retiring Christopher Dodd, one of the lions of the Senate, the GOP primary winner was Linda McMahon, the former chief executive of World Wrestling Entertainment, who spent $22 million of her own money to win the primary with 49 percent of the vote. Rob Simmons, a former Congressman who had dropped out of the race only to re-enter it last month, had 28 percent, and Peter Schiff, a financier, had 23 percent. McMahon now faces Richard Blumenthal, the state’s popular five-term attorney general whose luster has been tarnished when he was caught lying about serving in Vietnam. McMahon plans on spending $30 million in the general election.

Voter turnout was 20 percent. More on the races in Connecticut from the Hartford Courant.

Minnesota Primary Results
The main event in the land of ten thousand lakes was the Democratic-Farm Labor gubernatorial primary. The Associate Press has called the race for former US Senator Mark Dayton, an heir to the Dayton Department store fortune. After midnight, with 97 percent of the vote counted, the former US Senator led the Minnesota Speaker of the House Margaret Anderson Kelliher by about 4,500 votes -- enough that no recount would be needed. Matt Entenza, an Oxford-trained lawyer who served six years in the Minnesota House of Representatives, finished a distant third.

Should Mark Dayton indeed be confirmed as the winner, he will go on to face Republican nominee Tom Emmer and the Independence Party's Tom Horner. The GOP has controlled the Governor's Mansion in St. Paul for 24 years. More on the Governor's race from the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

There were also competitive primaries for House seats. In the Minnesota Second Congressional District, Shelley Madore defeated Dan Powers and will now face the Republican incumbent John Kline. In the Minnesota Fourth, Fifth and Eight Congressional Districts, incumbent Congresswoman Betty McCollum, Congressman Keith Ellison and Congressman James Oberstar coasted to victory over their primary challengers. In the Minnesota Sixth Congressional District, Tarryl Clark won 69 percent of the vote to defeat Maureen Kennedy Reed and will now face Rep. Michelle Bachmann.

There's more...

CT-Sen: Sky not falling

Looks like I overreacted in last week's post about how Connecticut Attorney General Dick Blumenthal has spoken about his Vietnam-era service record. The original New York Times account was damning, but some local media have pushed back on the story. Colin McEnroe of the Hartford Courant posted a long list of "flaws" in the New York Times piece, which McEnroe characterized as "weak journalism with very little meat on its bones." If you watch the whole video excerpted by the New York Times, you'll see that Blumenthal describes himself as "someone who served in the military during the Vietnam-era in the Marine Corps" before saying later, "we have learned something very important since the days that I served in Vietnam." Also, Blumenthal was indeed on the Harvard swim team in college (though not the team captain). The Times piece had suggested Blumenthal embellished his resume by wrongly claiming to have been on that team.

On Friday Connecticut Democrats held their state convention and nominated Blumenthal by acclamation after primary opponent Merrick Alpert withdrew his name from consideration.

Yesterday Blumenthal apologized again, telling the Hartford Courant,

"At times when I have sought to honor veterans, I have not been as clear or precise as I should have been about my service in the Marine Corps Reserves,'' Blumenthal said in a statement emailed to the Courant late Sunday by his spokeswoman, Maura Downes. "I have firmly and clearly expressed regret and taken responsibility for my words.

"I have made mistakes and I am sorry. I truly regret offending anyone,'' Blumenthal said. "I will always champion the cause of Connecticut's and our nation's veterans."

Today Blumenthal's campaign released an internal poll showing him ahead of likely Republican nominee Linda McMahon 55 percent to 40 percent, even though 91 percent of respondents had heard about the controversy regarding his statements about Vietnam. Last week the Republican-leaning pollster Rasmussen found Blumenthal ahead of McMahon 48 percent to 45 percent and leading former Representative Rob Simmons 50 percent to 39 percent. Not only could Blumenthal still win this race, he may still be favored to win. Charlie Cook declared this race a "tossup" just after the New York Times story broke.

What do you think, MyDD readers?

CT-Sen: Big trouble for Blumenthal

Since Senator Chris Dodd announced that he would not seek re-election, it has seemed that Democrats no longer had to worry about defending our U.S. Senate seat in Connecticut. Attorney General Richard Blumenthal has comfortably led every Republican opponent in every poll.

That was then, this is now:

“We have learned something important since the days that I served in Vietnam,” Mr. Blumenthal said to the group gathered in Norwalk in March 2008. “And you exemplify it. Whatever we think about the war, whatever we call it — Afghanistan or Iraq — we owe our military men and women unconditional support.”

There was one problem: Mr. Blumenthal, a Democrat now running for the United States Senate, never served in Vietnam. He obtained at least five military deferments from 1965 to 1970 and took repeated steps that enabled him to avoid going to war, according to records. [...]

But what is striking about Mr. Blumenthal’s record is the contrast between the many steps he took that allowed him to avoid Vietnam, and the misleading way he often speaks about that period of his life now, especially when he is speaking at veterans’ ceremonies or other patriotic events. [...]

In an interview on Monday, the attorney general said that he had misspoken about his service during the Norwalk event and might have misspoken on other occasions. “My intention has always been to be completely clear and accurate and straightforward, out of respect to the veterans who served in Vietnam,” he said. [...]

But the way he speaks about his military service has led to confusion and frequent mischaracterizations of his biography in his home state newspapers. In at least eight newspaper articles published in Connecticut from 2003 to 2009, he is described as having served in Vietnam. [...]

And the idea that he served in Vietnam has become such an accepted part of his public biography that when a national outlet, Slate magazine, produced a profile of Mr. Blumenthal in 2006, it said he had “enlisted in the Marines rather than duck the Vietnam draft.”

It does not appear that Mr. Blumenthal ever sought to correct those mistakes.

I don't get it. By many accounts, Blumenthal has been planning to run for Senate for a long time. Why would he use misleading language about his wartime service and never correct reports that described him as a Vietnam veteran?

At least the New York Times broke this story when there is still time to nominate a different Democrat.

UPDATE: Here are competing videos: Republican candidate Linda McMahon is pushing one of Blumenthal claiming in 2008 that we've learned things "since the days that I served in Vietnam." Meanwhile, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee is pushing this video from this year, in which Blumenthal clearly says he did not serve in Vietnam.

Dems UnEndorse Joe Lieberman; Karl Rove Endorses

You can track former supporters of Joe Lieberman who are now backing Ned Lamont at www.UnEndorsed.blogspot.com. Meanwhile, Karl Rove is going to bat for his favorite (former) Democrat:
According to a close Lieberman adviser, the President's political guru, Karl Rove, has reached out to the Lieberman camp with a message straight from the Oval Office: "The boss wants to help. Whatever we can do, we will do."

There's more...

CT-Sen: Sky not falling

Looks like I overreacted in last week's post about how Connecticut Attorney General Dick Blumenthal has spoken about his Vietnam-era service record. The original New York Times account was damning, but some local media have pushed back on the story. Colin McEnroe of the Hartford Courant posted a long list of "flaws" in the New York Times piece, which McEnroe characterized as "weak journalism with very little meat on its bones." If you watch the whole video excerpted by the New York Times, you'll see that Blumenthal describes himself as "someone who served in the military during the Vietnam-era in the Marine Corps" before saying later, "we have learned something very important since the days that I served in Vietnam." Also, Blumenthal was indeed on the Harvard swim team in college (though not the team captain). The Times piece had suggested Blumenthal embellished his resume by wrongly claiming to have been on that team.

On Friday Connecticut Democrats held their state convention and nominated Blumenthal by acclamation after primary opponent Merrick Alpert withdrew his name from consideration.

Yesterday Blumenthal apologized again, telling the Hartford Courant,

"At times when I have sought to honor veterans, I have not been as clear or precise as I should have been about my service in the Marine Corps Reserves,'' Blumenthal said in a statement emailed to the Courant late Sunday by his spokeswoman, Maura Downes. "I have firmly and clearly expressed regret and taken responsibility for my words.

"I have made mistakes and I am sorry. I truly regret offending anyone,'' Blumenthal said. "I will always champion the cause of Connecticut's and our nation's veterans."

Today Blumenthal's campaign released an internal poll showing him ahead of likely Republican nominee Linda McMahon 55 percent to 40 percent, even though 91 percent of respondents had heard about the controversy regarding his statements about Vietnam. Last week the Republican-leaning pollster Rasmussen found Blumenthal ahead of McMahon 48 percent to 45 percent and leading former Representative Rob Simmons 50 percent to 39 percent. Not only could Blumenthal still win this race, he may still be favored to win. Charlie Cook declared this race a "tossup"

just after the New York Times story broke.

What do you think, MyDD readers?

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