Inside the Fukushima Evacuation Zone

A Japanese journalist, Tetsuo Jimbo, ventured through the Fukushima nuclear reactor evacuation zone last week filing the above video report. The video is in Japanese with English subtitles.

On March 12th, the Japanese government issued a mandatory evacuation for the residents living within a 20 kilometer radius of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant that was hobbled by the devastating tsunami that followed the powerful 9.0 earthquake that struck the northeastern part of Honshu. The video captures a surreal scene of towns largely devoid of life apart from dogs abandoned by their owners.

Japanese Anti-Nuclear Groups Need Your Help

I’m inserting portions of an email I received from <a href="http://adifferentkindofluxury.blogspot.com/">Andy Couturier</a>.

<em>I spoke with Atsuko Watanabe, from Chapter 3 of my book (A Different Kind of Luxury).  She recommended two groups, both of which, she says, would be helped *tremendously* by a donation of $1000.

After getting two suggestions from Atsuko, I spoke later with my old colleague and friend Koichi Honda, who speaks excellent English and uses email.  His email is: hondak@mb.pikara.ne.jp .  I have copied him in this email.  His phone number is: 011-81-88-665-0758 Be sure to check the time difference before calling. I usually call between 4 PM and 11 PM California time.  He’s the best person to be in contact with.

Here are two groups.  One is a national group which, among other things, provides crucial factual information about nuclear power.  Honda-san says “we check with them every day to see what’s happening.”

</em>

<em>The second group is a local Shikoku group (the island I lived on for 4 years, and where five people I profiled live.  Please see the map in the book.).  They are fighting to close down the nuclear reactor in Matsuyama city, and their leader is Ms. Kyoko Ono.  They will be protesting at a shareholders meeting in May, and they need money to fund their campaign and get the word out.  They are definitely “scrappy” as you asked for.  So here’s the information.

The first group:

Based in Tokyo, we are the Citizen`s Nuclear Information Center (CNIC). With a network of scientists, activists, and common citizens, we work to create a nuclear free world.

Their website in English is: http://www.cnic.jp/english/
Here’s how to support them: http://www.cnic.jp/english/cnic/support.html
People outside Japan should send an international postal money order made out to Citizens’ Nuclear Information Center. Please specify the purpose of the money order as ‘Donation’. Alternatively, you can ask us to send you details regarding bank transfers.
Citizens’ Nuclear Information Center
3F Kotobuki Bldg., 1-58-15 Higashi-nakano, Nakano-ku, Tokyo 164 Japan
Tel: 81-3-5330-9520; Fax: 81-3-5330-9530

The second group:

Nuclear Power “Sayonara” Shikoku Network.  This group is fighting to close down the nuclear power station in Shikoku.  Please contact Mr. Honda about them and their work.  He’s an active local member.  The webpage I found for them, only in Japanese, is here:

http://genpatsu-sayonara.net/?p=25

I would imagine they don’t have the resources or the time to translate their website into English.  Also, I think using an international postal money order is the way to donate to them.

Lastly, Oizumi (Chapter 1) has faxed me a list of nuclear power companies/ plant administrators, and he asks us (fervently) that we CALL them up and say, in Englsih: “Shut down the nuclear power plants.”  I think this could actually be effective, for us to call from the US.  I will get you that list when I receive it (it was faxed to my friend Matt).  For more information on Oizumi and his activities, please look at my recent blog posts at http://differentkindofluxury.com Cynthia has gotten together to buy him geiger counters.

My other friend, Kai Sawyer, may be able to help out with groups doing anti nuclear work.  I’ve also cc’d him.  He’s bilingual, and has just fled from Tokyo.  He’s a young permaculture / engaged Buddhism activist, and a fantastic person.  His excellent blog is here, with info about the post-tsunami and earthquake and nuclear situation: http://livingpermaculture.blogspot.com/

Before I got off the phone, Honda san said to me “We Japanese are very strong, and helping each other we can overcome this.”

Best,
Andy
</em>

 

Meet Matt Dunne – The Issues

On Wednesday, I introduced you to Matt Dunne. Vermont hasn’t had a progressive Governor since Howard Dean, and Matt’s background makes him the right candidate first for the race and then for the job. Wednesday’s post described his career in technology, dedication to service, and legislative accomplishments. Please support him at ActBlue – absentee ballots have already been mailed out and his first commercial is ready to go on TV, so he needs our support now.

While Matt’s background makes him the candidate who can win, it’s the issues that make him the candidate who should win. He is focusing his campaign on jobs and economic development, and his environmental advocacy has gained national attention. I’ll go into detail about those two issues, but know that his website also offers plans on health care, agriculture, education, civil rights, women’s rights, and government transparency.

Dunne’s top economic priority is bringing broadband Internet to Vermont, which has perhaps the lowest penetration rate of any state. That means Vermont falls further and further behind as the country’s economy moves online. A letter in the Rutland Herald said the author heard “a Windham County businessman [tell Matt] that the day high-speed Internet comes to the town of Dover he’ll hire 15 people.” Matt’s background as an executive with a local software company and now with Google makes him the right person to get this done. In a recent interview with the AP, picked up by MSNBC, he expanded on this vision of economy-by-technology:

"We need to, and I believe have an opportunity to, go from one of the lowest broadband penetration states in the country to the first state that brings fiber-optic high-speed Internet to every home in the state," Dunne said in an interview. "And that's an incredible opportunity for us to move from a state that's not thought of as being a technological center to being a technological center."…

Deploying broadband and improving cell phone service statewide are keys to other issues on which Dunne is focusing his campaign. He wants to streamline and improve education through greater use of distance learning… On energy, Dunne thinks "smart metering," which can tell electric customers moment-to-moment how much power they're using, combined with Vermonters' famed frugality, will enable the state to shave megawatts off its power demand…

"I've heard from business people in the state of Vermont that they have difficulty recruiting engineers, because when they recruit engineers even from the University of Vermont, that engineer finds out that the home they could afford as a first home as a young engineer doesn't have broadband, they go someplace else. When they find out they don't have cell (phone) reception, even at their place of work, they choose to go someplace else."

More below the fold, including a video from climate hero Bill McKibben.

There's more...

Meet Matt Dunne – The Issues

On Wednesday, I introduced you to Matt Dunne. Vermont hasn’t had a progressive Governor since Howard Dean, and Matt’s background makes him the right candidate first for the race and then for the job. Wednesday’s post described his career in technology, dedication to service, and legislative accomplishments. Please support him at ActBlue – absentee ballots have already been mailed out and his first commercial is ready to go on TV, so he needs our support now.

While Matt’s background makes him the candidate who can win, it’s the issues that make him the candidate who should win. He is focusing his campaign on jobs and economic development, and his environmental advocacy has gained national attention. I’ll go into detail about those two issues, but know that his website also offers plans on health care, agriculture, education, civil rights, women’s rights, and government transparency.

Dunne’s top economic priority is bringing broadband Internet to Vermont, which has perhaps the lowest penetration rate of any state. That means Vermont falls further and further behind as the country’s economy moves online. A letter in the Rutland Herald said the author heard “a Windham County businessman [tell Matt] that the day high-speed Internet comes to the town of Dover he’ll hire 15 people.” Matt’s background as an executive with a local software company and now with Google makes him the right person to get this done. In a recent interview with the AP, picked up by MSNBC, he expanded on this vision of economy-by-technology:

"We need to, and I believe have an opportunity to, go from one of the lowest broadband penetration states in the country to the first state that brings fiber-optic high-speed Internet to every home in the state," Dunne said in an interview. "And that's an incredible opportunity for us to move from a state that's not thought of as being a technological center to being a technological center."…

Deploying broadband and improving cell phone service statewide are keys to other issues on which Dunne is focusing his campaign. He wants to streamline and improve education through greater use of distance learning… On energy, Dunne thinks "smart metering," which can tell electric customers moment-to-moment how much power they're using, combined with Vermonters' famed frugality, will enable the state to shave megawatts off its power demand…

"I've heard from business people in the state of Vermont that they have difficulty recruiting engineers, because when they recruit engineers even from the University of Vermont, that engineer finds out that the home they could afford as a first home as a young engineer doesn't have broadband, they go someplace else. When they find out they don't have cell (phone) reception, even at their place of work, they choose to go someplace else."

More below the fold, including a video from climate hero Bill McKibben.

There's more...

Meet Matt Dunne – The Issues

On Wednesday, I introduced you to Matt Dunne. Vermont hasn’t had a progressive Governor since Howard Dean, and Matt’s background makes him the right candidate first for the race and then for the job. Wednesday’s post described his career in technology, dedication to service, and legislative accomplishments. Please support him at ActBlue – absentee ballots have already been mailed out and his first commercial is ready to go on TV, so he needs our support now.

While Matt’s background makes him the candidate who can win, it’s the issues that make him the candidate who should win. He is focusing his campaign on jobs and economic development, and his environmental advocacy has gained national attention. I’ll go into detail about those two issues, but know that his website also offers plans on health care, agriculture, education, civil rights, women’s rights, and government transparency.

Dunne’s top economic priority is bringing broadband Internet to Vermont, which has perhaps the lowest penetration rate of any state. That means Vermont falls further and further behind as the country’s economy moves online. A letter in the Rutland Herald said the author heard “a Windham County businessman [tell Matt] that the day high-speed Internet comes to the town of Dover he’ll hire 15 people.” Matt’s background as an executive with a local software company and now with Google makes him the right person to get this done. In a recent interview with the AP, picked up by MSNBC, he expanded on this vision of economy-by-technology:

"We need to, and I believe have an opportunity to, go from one of the lowest broadband penetration states in the country to the first state that brings fiber-optic high-speed Internet to every home in the state," Dunne said in an interview. "And that's an incredible opportunity for us to move from a state that's not thought of as being a technological center to being a technological center."…

Deploying broadband and improving cell phone service statewide are keys to other issues on which Dunne is focusing his campaign. He wants to streamline and improve education through greater use of distance learning… On energy, Dunne thinks "smart metering," which can tell electric customers moment-to-moment how much power they're using, combined with Vermonters' famed frugality, will enable the state to shave megawatts off its power demand…

"I've heard from business people in the state of Vermont that they have difficulty recruiting engineers, because when they recruit engineers even from the University of Vermont, that engineer finds out that the home they could afford as a first home as a young engineer doesn't have broadband, they go someplace else. When they find out they don't have cell (phone) reception, even at their place of work, they choose to go someplace else."

More below the fold, including a video from climate hero Bill McKibben.

There's more...

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