CRUSH: Facebook Nation

It's the return of CRUSH! After taking a short summer hiatus, we're back in action, crushing the week's social media news into a juicy 3 minutes or less. And this week we're even giving you a special behind-the-scenes look into Crush Studios, so don't forget to join us on Facebook and Twitter.

The newest and third-largest nation in the world - Facebook Nation - is having trouble getting its currency off the ground. Facebook's announcement that Facebook credits will soon be the sole currency for all apps and games, has some of its 500,000 million citizens (i.e. developers) putting up a fight.

But Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg better start focusing on national security because other forces are preparing to attack. A web designer has filed a lawsuit against the social networking site claiming that, based on a contract entered in 2003 with Zuckerberg, he is entitled to 84% of Facebook, or $12.6 billion. And a Judge in New York has ruled to freeze the social networking site's assets until the case is resolved.

So Mr. Zuckerberg, how would you like to pay for that? Cash, credit, check or...Facebook credits?

In this week's quick hits:

  • Ebay has it's own legal woes, facing a copyright infringement lawsuit over PayPal technology that could cost them almost $4 billion.
  • Tweet Deck surpassed 15 million downloads this week, meaning that apparently more than 15 million people have yet to hear of Hootsuite.
  • And just when you thought Chatroulette couldn't get any creepier...it has now added a local feature, so you can now tell just how close that person (or body part) really is.

And in world news, China's online population has skyrocketed to "420 million as more people access the Internet with cell phones." The Communist government has renewed Google's operating license, ending the months-long stalemate over Internet censorship and providing momentum for rights groups, such as Human Rights First, in their effort to create an open Internet behind the Great Chinese Firewall.

And that brings us to our "Crush of the Week" where we would like to recognize the brilliant folks over at Old Spice for their new, creative social media marketing campaign that is both entertaining and effective.

 

Make A Father's Day Declaration

I invite you to join me in making the following declaration:

I declare here and now I believe in respect. I am a person ready to take a stand against relationship violence and abuse. I want all to know this symbolizes my commitment to solve problems through conversation, not confrontation. Together we can teach others to lift their hands in embrace, not in anger. We can show compassion equals strength, and by doing so, help shape a world free of relationship violence.

To declare it, go here.

After you declare it, share it.

The Family Violence Prevention Fund is on a mission to create a future of healthy relationships. And as such, they are asking people to Give RESPECT!, and make a declaration.

So far, mostly women have signed. Women should sign, and I'm asking the men to step up. Relationship violence is a problem that lives in the shadows. To end it, we must bring it into the light and talk about it. You can help by making the declaration, and sending it on.

And to the women reading this, please sign the declaration too and send it to the men you know, and ask them to make a stand.

After all, what is it to be a man?

It's not measured by the size of your wallet, but by the size of your heart.
It's not determined by the strength of your muscles, but by the strength of your courage.
It's not judged by how tall you stand, but by what you stand up for.

And this Father's Day, it's time to man up.

 

 

CRUSH: Facebook Unfiltered

CRUSH Roadtrip 2010 has been officially underway and this week we break down Facebook like you've never seen it before - giving you not only the latest from the news desk, but also what people on the street have to say.

While a handful of Senators spoke out against Facebook's new automatic opt-in privacy policy, this week the Electronic Privacy Information Center filed a formal Federal Trade Commission complaint against the social media network - requesting that the FTC "investigate Facebook, enjoin its unfair and deceptive business practices, and require Facebook to protect the privacy of Facebook users."

However, Facebook was preoccupied attending to a more pressing privacy issue. The chat feature suffered a major technology glitch, causing some users private chats and friend requests to be exposed to the entirety of their friends list.

Which brings us to our prediction that Facebook will be upgrading this chat feature in the coming months. Especially since Russian investor DST, who bought the instant messaging relic ICQ from AOL, has increased its stake in Facebook from 2% to 10%. Giving DST more power in the decision making process and the chance to put its newest purchase into something useful.

Sadly, the future doesn't look bright for all of social media. Digg is the most recent social media company to announce layoffs, sending an email to employees informing them that 10% of the workforce would be let go. And this comes on the heels of Ning announcing it would be cutting its workforce by 40% and removing all free services.

And what do the people have to say about all of this? Well, we take a stop at Denver, Colorado and get some interesting opinions from three individuals who actually don't have a Facebook account, a very rare breed in this day and age.

We almost had the chance to ask Rod Blagojevich, former governor of Illinois, what his thoughts were on the subject when we spotted him in the car next to us...unfortunately he drove away too soon.

But the best part of our Roadtrip so far has got to be this week's CRUSH of the Week, where we got to meet up with the creator of Captain Planet. This was only stop one, so be sure to stay tuned for more in the upcoming weeks and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube to find out if we're coming to a city near you!

 

5 Senators Who Need to Get in the Climate Legislation Game

It isn't rare to hear about 'back benches' in Congress. Generally these are members who, on one issue, or on all issues, don't make much noise, go with the flow, and try to avoid controversy. In sports, the term "bench warmer" is similar, but rather than a lack of desire to play, bench warmers tend to have a relative lack of skill. In fact, if a member of a sports team wanted to sit out the big plays, I doubt they would be on the team for long. . .

The game today is comprehensive climate change legislation, and there are five Senators that talk some game in the locker room, but when the clock is running, you can't find them on the field.

Senator LeMieux was substituted onto the Florida team:

"There might have been a time where the jury was out [on climate change], but the jury is in now, and we know this is an issue. We can't afford to ignore it and be wrong."

With BP dumping oil all over his home turf, you'd think LeMieux would be itching for some action on clean energy. Where is he?

Senator Pryor is no stranger to fans of Alabama. Not only has been on the team since 2003, but he plays the position his father played in the 80's and 90's.

"As part of [the effort to move our country toward energy independence], I believe that we must move beyond oil, gas, and coal and focus on cleaner alternatives and new sources of energy, including renewable fuels. Arkansas, in particular, is rich in bio diesel resources...As your Senator I will fight to help Arkansas become a leader in the new energy economy."

If Senator Pryor wants his kids to be able to continue the legacy, he better get on the field and show some hustle.

Senator Voinovich has played most of the positions on the Ohio team. He has been in the game as long as anyone, and this is his final season. He should be thinking legacy, and he has one major rivalry left unsettled.

"Climate change, and how our nation addresses it, is of incredible importance."

C'mon Senator! Are you going to let the rookies address it? Git R Done!

Arguably one of the best players in the National League, Senator Lugar had carried Indiana to victory again and again. He is one of the defense players out there.

"Scientists are saying that climate change could cause human displacement, spark wars around the globe and completely disrupt international trade...We do have an obligation to our children, our grandchildren, the earth to think about these things."

Lugar has been in the game longer than any Republican in the Senate. It isn't like him to get benched when it matters.

And finally there is New Hampshire's Senator Gregg who is also throwing in the towel at the end of the season.

"we have a responsibility to take care of our planet for future generations, and climate change legislation will help stem the environmental impacts of global warming and will spur development of new technologies that bolster our energy independence."

Gregg's legacy is his to shape now. Is he a man made of granite that can do what is best for the Granite State? Or has he grown soft, and resigned to phoning it in for the last few games of his career?

One this is certain, this season is shaping up to be one for the history books. Any of these players can make history - but they can't do it from the benches.

 

 

5 Senators Who Need to Get in the Climate Legislation Game

It isn't rare to hear about 'back benches' in Congress. Generally these are members who, on one issue, or on all issues, don't make much noise, go with the flow, and try to avoid controversy. In sports, the term "bench warmer" is similar, but rather than a lack of desire to play, bench warmers tend to have a relative lack of skill. In fact, if a member of a sports team wanted to sit out the big plays, I doubt they would be on the team for long. . .

The game today is comprehensive climate change legislation, and there are five Senators that talk some game in the locker room, but when the clock is running, you can't find them on the field.

Senator LeMieux was substituted onto the Florida team:

"There might have been a time where the jury was out [on climate change], but the jury is in now, and we know this is an issue. We can't afford to ignore it and be wrong."

With BP dumping oil all over his home turf, you'd think LeMieux would be itching for some action on clean energy. Where is he?

Senator Pryor is no stranger to fans of Alabama. Not only has been on the team since 2003, but he plays the position his father played in the 80's and 90's.

"As part of [the effort to move our country toward energy independence], I believe that we must move beyond oil, gas, and coal and focus on cleaner alternatives and new sources of energy, including renewable fuels. Arkansas, in particular, is rich in bio diesel resources...As your Senator I will fight to help Arkansas become a leader in the new energy economy."

If Senator Pryor wants his kids to be able to continue the legacy, he better get on the field and show some hustle.

Senator Voinovich has played most of the positions on the Ohio team. He has been in the game as long as anyone, and this is his final season. He should be thinking legacy, and he has one major rivalry left unsettled.

"Climate change, and how our nation addresses it, is of incredible importance."

C'mon Senator! Are you going to let the rookies address it? Git R Done!

Arguably one of the best players in the National League, Senator Lugar had carried Indiana to victory again and again. He is one of the defense players out there.

"Scientists are saying that climate change could cause human displacement, spark wars around the globe and completely disrupt international trade...We do have an obligation to our children, our grandchildren, the earth to think about these things."

Lugar has been in the game longer than any Republican in the Senate. It isn't like him to get benched when it matters.

And finally there is New Hampshire's Senator Gregg who is also throwing in the towel at the end of the season.

"we have a responsibility to take care of our planet for future generations, and climate change legislation will help stem the environmental impacts of global warming and will spur development of new technologies that bolster our energy independence."

Gregg's legacy is his to shape now. Is he a man made of granite that can do what is best for the Granite State? Or has he grown soft, and resigned to phoning it in for the last few games of his career?

One this is certain, this season is shaping up to be one for the history books. Any of these players can make history - but they can't do it from the benches.

 

 

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