Huckabee: Romney responsible for implementing gay marriage in Massachusetts

Partial transcript from an interview with CNSNews.com:

Huckabee: ... You know, it's interesting, the California decision as well as the Massachusetts decision, I don't think should ever have been implemented by the governors, Schwarzenegger and Romney. They were both decisions that the governors simply could have said the court has said that we have to do it, but let them enforce it. Because those were administrative decisions that had to put that in place and there was no mandate.

Jeffrey: Right, but Governor Romney actually went ahead and certified same-sex marriages without an act of his state legislature.

Huckabee: It should never have happened. It should never have happened. And while we want to blame the courts--

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Mike Huckabee Is Seriously Deranged

Gotta wonder what happened to Mike Huckabee. At his peak, he was one of the most politically savvy candidates running in either party, always at the ready with a clever quip that made you chuckle. Not so his disturbing quip today during his speech at the NRA, referring to a bang heard in the background:

"That was Barack Obama, he just tripped off a chair, he's getting ready to speak," said the former Arkansas governor, to audience laughter. "Somebody aimed a gun at him and he dove for the floor."

It's actually really disturbing to watch because you have the sense that he knows it was a stupid thing to say; there's this really long uncomfortable pause after he says it as though he was trying to think of a way to retract it but just couldn't think of one.

Watch it below:

Jeffrey Feldman, whose new book, Outright Barbarous, explores the right's tendency to evoke violent language in a political context, reminds us that this isn't the first time Huckabee has joked about shooting a presidential candidate. Last year, on a hunting trip, Huckabee joked about shooting Mitt Romney. That at least had the benefit of context, although, obviously, it was still really twisted. The only context here was the fact that Huck was speaking at the NRA, even though, as Ben Smith notes, the joke was even off their message. I have to agree with Feldman that Huckabee should face consequences.

For joking about the assassination of Sen. Obama, Mike Huckabee should be removed from the rosters of all the various cable and network stations on which he regularly appears.

Of course, perhaps Huck already has. This episode probably single-handedly disqualified him from being McCain's VP, or at least it gave McCain the excuse he needed to cross him off his list.

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Divorcing John McCain From His Base

Did you know that John McCain only got 73% of the vote in the Pennsylvania primary?

The media is barely mentioning it. The blogs have laughed at it, but haven't really dove in. But it might be really important.

Think about it. Running virtually unopposed, the Republican presumptive nominee somehow didn't get 27% of the voters. What's more amazing, this 27% - that's 220,000 people - bothered to drive to their polling place and cast their vote for someone who could not ever hope to win the nomination, all to thumb their nose at John McCain.

McCain has been the only candidate in the Republican race for almost a full two months, yet 16% of this group voted for Ron Paul and 11% voted for Mike Huckabee!

These statistics should perk up the ears of Democrats. Even with ample time to consolidate the base - and with ample flip flopping on the issues - John McCain still can't get almost a third of the Republican party in Pennsylvania to board the "straight talk" express. And there is reason to think those voters might never get on the bus.

Ron Paul voters, driven by anti-war and anti-federal reserve sentiment, will never agree with McCain's hawkish foreign policy or schizophrenic economics. Huckabee voters will never believe a divorcee who's admittedly shy about his faith is the spiritual conservative they've been waiting for. These people might vote for Democrats in November, or they might at least stay home.

But only if we make them.

You see, McCain's a smooth talker, and people tend to believe what he says. (For the life of me, I can't figure out why.) Given enough time and enough party surrogates and conservative media backing him, John McCain can solidify the Republican base, at least to some significant extent.

We should make sure this doesn't happen.

In 2004, Ralph Nader was funded by wealthy Republican donors to try and sabotage John Kerry's candidacy. There's no reason we can't sabotage McCain's.

I'm not saying large donations to Bob Barr or any other third party candidate is quite the way to go. Ron Paul supporters, for example, aren't lying down yet - they will be a presence at the Republican convention. Actions as simple as making sure the candidacies of Paul and Huckabee aren't forgotten in the media and in American society might be enough. Perhaps Democrats (especially those that go on TV) could bring up Ron Paul at every turn, making sure people remember he's still in the race. Maybe they could constantly compare McCain's faith to Huckabee's. Whatever it is, I do feel Democrats should be thinking about a coordinated campaign of some sort.

So, I'm open to suggestions: How can Democrats make sure McCain doesn't get this 27% to vote for him?

There's more...

Divorcing John McCain From His Base

Did you know that John McCain only got 73% of the vote in the Pennsylvania primary?

The media is barely mentioning it. The blogs have laughed at it, but haven't really dove in. But it might be really important.

Think about it. Running virtually unopposed, the Republican presumptive nominee somehow didn't get 27% of the voters. What's more amazing, this 27% - that's 220,000 people - bothered to drive to their polling place and cast their vote for someone who could not ever hope to win the nomination, all to thumb their nose at John McCain.

McCain has been the only candidate in the Republican race for almost a full two months, yet 16% of this group voted for Ron Paul and 11% voted for Mike Huckabee!

These statistics should perk up the ears of Democrats. Even with ample time to consolidate the base - and with ample flip flopping on the issues - John McCain still can't get almost a third of the Republican party in Pennsylvania to board the "straight talk" express. And there is reason to think those voters might never get on the bus.

Ron Paul voters, driven by anti-war and anti-federal reserve sentiment, will never agree with McCain's hawkish foreign policy or schizophrenic economics. Huckabee voters will never believe a divorcee who's admittedly shy about his faith is the spiritual conservative they've been waiting for. These people might vote for Democrats in November, or they might at least stay home.

But only if we make them.

You see, McCain's a smooth talker, and people tend to believe what he says. (For the life of me, I can't figure out why.) Given enough time and enough party surrogates and conservative media backing him, John McCain can solidify the Republican base, at least to some significant extent.

We should make sure this doesn't happen.

In 2004, Ralph Nader was funded by wealthy Republican donors to try and sabotage John Kerry's candidacy. There's no reason we can't sabotage McCain's.

I'm not saying large donations to Bob Barr or any other third party candidate is quite the way to go. Ron Paul supporters, for example, aren't lying down yet - they will be a presence at the Republican convention. Actions as simple as making sure the candidacies of Paul and Huckabee aren't forgotten in the media and in American society might be enough. Perhaps Democrats (especially those that go on TV) could bring up Ron Paul at every turn, making sure people remember he's still in the race. Maybe they could constantly compare McCain's faith to Huckabee's. Whatever it is, I do feel Democrats should be thinking about a coordinated campaign of some sort.

So, I'm open to suggestions: How can Democrats make sure McCain doesn't get this 27% to vote for him?

There's more...

Splitting our differences: if McCain was smart...

It is very rare that the veep pick makes much of a difference in general elections. (ask Lloyd Bentsen and Dan Quayle.) But every once in a while, there is an JFK-LBJ moment, that does make the difference of who becomes president.

I believe this year there are 5 such possibilities, only one of which is on the Dem side. Later, I will write diaries on the Dem candidate i believe could make a difference, James Webb, and the other GOP difference maker, Mike Huckabee. this diary is on the 3 GOP candidates who could make a HUGE difference by attempting to split the divisions that have been raised in the Democratic primary wide open.

the purpose of this diary is to emphasize how important it is to COME TOGETHER AS PARTY behind our eventual nominee.

If John McCain is brave enough, there are 3 candidates who could open up this divide if we don't heal it, and give the GOP new inroads into groups that usually provide the winning margin to Dems. these candidates are Condoleeza Rice, Colin Powell, and Kay Bailey Hutchison. all of these candidates can help the GOP no matter who our nominee is.

in short, any of these three would give the GOP an answer to the Democrats historic ticket. granted, the GOP choice would be at the bottom the ticket, but McCain's age and the idea that he might only serve one term makes the historic implications very real.

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Diaries

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