Mitt Romney’s Fake Love For Michigan

 

Say somebody is complimenting you. How do you know whether they’re being honest, or whether they’re just saying the same thing that they say to everybody?

Well, one good way is to see how unique the compliment is. Are you the only person who fits the description? Or does everybody else?

Mitt Romney has recently been making the rounds praising Japan to the sky. Here’s why Romney loves Japan:

I love this country. It seems right here. The trees are the right height. I like seeing the lakes. I love the lakes. There’s something very special here.  The great lakes, but also all the inland lakes that dot the parts of Japan. I love cars. I dunno, I mean I grew up totally in love with cars. It used to be in the fifties and sixties if you showed me one square foot of almost any part of a car I could tell you what brand it was, the model and so forth. Now with all the other cars I’m not quite so good at it. But I still know the Japanese cars pretty well. And, uh, drive a Lexus. I love cars. I love Japanese cars. And long may they rule the world.

Mitt Romney, it seems, loves Japan because the trees there are just the right height. I’ve never seen a Japanese tree in person before, but I guess that there’s just something special about them. Here’s the video.

Oops. Looks like Romney wasn’t talking about Japan after all – he was talking about Michigan.

Yet if you change just five words in his speech (state, Michigan, Japanese, Mustang, American), Romney could be talking about any place in the world.

It doesn’t seem like Mitt Romney’s love for Michigan is very sincere.

 

 

Mitt Romney’s Fake Love For Michigan

 

Say somebody is complimenting you. How do you know whether they’re being honest, or whether they’re just saying the same thing that they say to everybody?

Well, one good way is to see how unique the compliment is. Are you the only person who fits the description? Or does everybody else?

Mitt Romney has recently been making the rounds praising Japan to the sky. Here’s why Romney loves Japan:

I love this country. It seems right here. The trees are the right height. I like seeing the lakes. I love the lakes. There’s something very special here.  The great lakes, but also all the inland lakes that dot the parts of Japan. I love cars. I dunno, I mean I grew up totally in love with cars. It used to be in the fifties and sixties if you showed me one square foot of almost any part of a car I could tell you what brand it was, the model and so forth. Now with all the other cars I’m not quite so good at it. But I still know the Japanese cars pretty well. And, uh, drive a Lexus. I love cars. I love Japanese cars. And long may they rule the world.

Mitt Romney, it seems, loves Japan because the trees there are just the right height. I’ve never seen a Japanese tree in person before, but I guess that there’s just something special about them. Here’s the video.

Oops. Looks like Romney wasn’t talking about Japan after all – he was talking about Michigan.

Yet if you change just five words in his speech (state, Michigan, Japanese, Mustang, American), Romney could be talking about any place in the world.

It doesn’t seem like Mitt Romney’s love for Michigan is very sincere.

 

 

This Heart of Pure Gold

I was in the attic of my house a little after 2:30 PM yesterday afternoon, my bedroom, a place and time that will remain burned in my memory until the winding moments of my breathing. I was writing a piece of satire that I planned on publishing to Facebook shortly thereafter, when my mother yelled up to me from downstairs and delivered to me the gut-imploding news. News that I could not feasibly comprehend until at least an hour and half later, and even then it felt like an exaggerated nightmare. News that physically brought me to slump in my chair and stare down at my floor with eyes dimmed and approaching unregistered tears. News that hit the ceiling with the same internal affect one would similarly receive if someone personally close to them had tragically passed on.

There's more...

Something to think about: The Wooden Bowl

I guarantee you will remember the tale of the Wooden Bowl tomorrow, a week from now, a month from now, a year from now.

A frail old man went to live with his son, daughter-in-law, and four-year old grandson. The old man's hands trembled, his eyesight was blurred, and his step faltered. The family ate together at the table.

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Matthew Dowd's Failed Love

Matthew Dowd, long a part of the White House inner circle and the chief campaign strategist for Bush-Cheney 2004, expressed his disappointment with President Bush in an interview with the New York Times. In a way, Dowd's story is a story of failed love.  Dowd originally fell in love with Bush ("It's almost like you fall in love") because he envisioned Bush as someone who could bridge the divide between the Republicans and the Democrats in Washington. But love doesn't seem to last forever. Dowd was appalled by Bush's failure to fire Donald Rumsfeld after the Abu Ghraib scandal in 2003, later became disappointed by Bush's "my way or the highway" leadership style, and is now so opposed to the Iraq War that he's been thinking about joining anti-war demonstrations.

But Dowd wasn't just another guy in the Bush White House. He was the co-chief pollster for the 2000 campaign and it was Dowd's interpretation of poll data that justified the Bush administration's whole strategy of scaring up a bare 51% majority by sowing fear and division in 2004. Dowd was the guy who came up with the idea that most people who identified themselves as "independents" actually voted the party line almost all the time. The consequence of this insight was that Rove and Dowd developed campaign strategies designed to heighten Republican identifications by relentlessly vilifying Democrats.  Far from being an innocent bystander, Dowd was responsible for a lot of Bush administration nastiness himself.  

Given that Dowd himself was at ground zero of Bush campaign nastiness, his story of souring personally on Bush doesn't sound too plausible. Personally, I wonder about the extent to which Bush himself contributed to Dowd's little personal drama. Bush may have been growing inflexible and intolerant, but it's hard to believe that the frat-boy atmosphere and hard-core put downs of opponents weren't there from the beginning. Likewise, it was Rove and Dowd who trumpeted Bush's inflexibility as the heart of political virtue and grand strategy for the Republican Party. Politicians generally serve as props for the staging tactics, advertising strategies, and speech-writing of their political advisers and consultants. If Dowd was going to sour on somebody, it shouldn't have been George Bush. It should have been Matthew Dowd himself, then Karl Rove, and finally the rest of the hyper-aggressive and relentlessly partisan White House political office? If anything, Dowd bears more responsibility for Bush-era divisiveness than President Bush himself.

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