Wrong, Wrong and Right on Federal Courts for Terrorism Cases

Gabor Rona
International Legal Director

There are two distinct camps criticizing the use of federal courts to try terrorism suspects after last week’s federal court conviction of former Guantanamo detainee Ahmed Ghailani. Both are wrong.

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Wrong, Wrong and Right on Federal Courts for Terrorism Cases

Gabor Rona
International Legal Director

There are two distinct camps criticizing the use of federal courts to try terrorism suspects after last week’s federal court conviction of former Guantanamo detainee Ahmed Ghailani. Both are wrong.

There's more...

CIA Misconduct in Peruvian Killing Underlines Inconsistencies--and Problems--in U.S. Policies

Talk about exquisite timing.

Two days ago, the New York Times reported on the just-released publication of a 2008 report on the CIA's negligence, deceit, disregard for its own rules and stonewalling in connection with investigation of its practice of shooting down airplanes in Peru in 2001. Back then, it was deadly mistakes made in the war on drugs.

A day later, the Wall Street Journal published a report about ramping up the CIA's targeted killing program in the war against terrorism (or against Al Qaida, as the Administration now calls it).

The Peru example underscores why the United States should not be using the CIA to conduct targeted killings. The CIA operates, understandably, in secret. When and if its conduct is investigated, the reports of its violations usually remain secret as well. The power to impose death should not be delegated to an entity, and to individuals, so shielded from standard measures of accountability.

There's more...

CIA Misconduct in Peruvian Killing Underlines Inconsistencies--and Problems--in U.S. Policies

Talk about exquisite timing.

Two days ago, the New York Times reported on the just-released publication of a 2008 report on the CIA's negligence, deceit, disregard for its own rules and stonewalling in connection with investigation of its practice of shooting down airplanes in Peru in 2001. Back then, it was deadly mistakes made in the war on drugs.

A day later, the Wall Street Journal published a report about ramping up the CIA's targeted killing program in the war against terrorism (or against Al Qaida, as the Administration now calls it).

The Peru example underscores why the United States should not be using the CIA to conduct targeted killings. The CIA operates, understandably, in secret. When and if its conduct is investigated, the reports of its violations usually remain secret as well. The power to impose death should not be delegated to an entity, and to individuals, so shielded from standard measures of accountability.

There's more...

A Show Trial Wraps Up at Guantanamo Bay

In a surprising verdict issued late Sunday afternoon, a military commission jury sentenced Omar Khadr to 40 years in confinement. Given that Khadr has already served eight years at the U.S. prison camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, that's a 48-year sentence for a child soldier. Khadr is also the only fighter charged by the U.S. government with murder on the battlefield since the start of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He was only 15 years old when, according to his guilty plea, in July 2002 he threw a grenade that killed a U.S. soldier.

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