The Latino Vote

By: Inoljt, http://thepolitikalblog.wordpress.com/

They're considered a minority in the United States, composing a rapidly growing sub-set of the population. The majority are immigrants; public sentiment, aroused by nativism, is sometimes hostile towards them. They vote heavily Democratic, but because many are immigrants they turn-out in numbers not as great as the share of the population they compose.

I'm not talking about Latinos. I'm talking about white Catholics in the early 20th century.

Today, Democrats hope that the Latino vote will be an essential part of a permanent majority, the keys to an unyielding period of Democratic dominance. Latinos were a major part of Obama's victory in states such as Nevada, New Mexico, and Colorado. They've turned California blue for the foreseeable future. Red states Arizona and Texas are home to millions of Latinos, who represent a threat to the Republican character of those two states. Opportunity beckons.

Or so it seems.

In reality, however, it seems that the path of the Latino vote is the same as that of the white Catholic vote.

More below the flip.

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Thursday Immigration Blog Roundup

This week's immigration blog roundup covers some new studies on migration and more.

Several new studies have found that immigrants are choosing to remain in their adopted countries rather than return to their countries of birth.  Despite the economic downturn, immigrants still see the United States as a land of opportunity and are content with their decision to move here.

President Obama is expected to address the Congressional Hispanic Caucus next week on immigration reform.  Representative Gutierrez and Senator Menendez are also expected to address the Caucus.

Last Saturday in Sacramento, hundreds marched to urge President Obama to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

Outgoing Senator Mel Martinez of Florida ended his tenure by stressing the need for immigration reform.  During his time as Senator, he worked with Senators McCain and Kennedy on immigration reform.

On December 6-8, the National Immigration Law Center will be holding its 7th National Low-Income Immigrant Rights Conference in Arlington, Virginia.  Attendees will share information and experiences and develop strategies around some of the core issues affecting low-income immigrants.

Lastly, ImmigrationProf Blog has a list of web resources for labor and immigration law for anyone considering hiring non-U.S. citizens.

Read more at The Opportunity Agenda website.

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Krugman, Cockburn: Nixon to Left of Kennedy, Obama

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Yet some folks today are still drawn to cults and anti-cults of personality, and still need to learn the basics.

Krugman (and Cockburn, who compares Teddy and Tricky on health care politics to Teddy's great detriment below fold) writes well on this 'obvious except to the deliberately deluding themselves' matter, and agrees with me (his second reason) on why. Nixon was a product of different, mildly more liberal, times. And Kennedy and Obama are products of these times, when politics with great purity involves serving a mountain of self-interested corporate money and bamboozling and toying with we the people.

If people get my comment header below, then looking back on Tricky Dick is enlightening about the primary problem of our time, the nearly complete loss of power by everyone except big corporations and the wealthy. (Why do some of you take our eyes off that, or (selectively) pretend it is not happening even when your favorites take huge quantities of corporate dough?)

Nixon the most liberal president we've had since Nixon

Those were different times: EPA, wage-and-price controls, detente with China/USSR, and even got us out of Vietnam.

'Sock it to me!'

by: fairleft @ Fri Aug 14, 2009 at 15:21:05 PM EDT

No doubt Nixon would've been a Dick (Cheney) in these times, no doubt about it, but, well read on, it's good Krugman:

Missing Richard Nixon
by Paul Krugman

. . .

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Weekly Immigration Wire: Kennedy Was Friend to Immigrants

By Nezua, TMC Mediawire Blogger

Sen. Ted Kennedy's death yesterday was a blow to the immigrant community, as New America Media reports. For over 40 years, Kennedy was a tireless fighter for immigrant rights and is remembered for many valuable accomplishments, not the least in making possible the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, which did away with the national-origin quotas that had been in effect in the US since 1924. Additionally, Kennedy help bring a close to the exploitive Bracero program, which supplied the U.S. cheap and temporary labor during World War II in the form of Mexican farm laborers who did not have proper protections or rights. Senator Kennedy also helped author the AgJobs bill of 2003, which gave undocumented farmers residency so they could continue working in the U.S. His legacy in the progress of immigration legislation is not in doubt.

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Ted Kennedy: Fearless Leader in the Fight against Hate Crime

Senator Kennedy's prolific career spanned nearly five decades, during which he authored more than 2,500 bills in the U.S. Senate. Several hundred have become public law. This fall we hope to add yet another bill to that distinguished list - the Matthew Shepard Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Prevention Act.

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