KS-Sen: Second Poll Shows Slattery is Competitive

Last week Rasmussen Reports released polling out of the Kansas Senate race showing former Democratic Congressman Jim Slattery, who has only been running for fewer than three months, well within striking distance of incumbent Republican Senator Pat Roberts, who led 52 percent to 40 percent. Today Daily Kos released its own polling on the race commissioned from nonpartisan pollster Research 2000 and, lo and behold, the numbers show Slattery down by that same 12-point margin.

Pat Roberts (R): 50 percent
Jim Slattery (D): 38 percent

Perhaps the most interesting thing about this poll is how high Slattery's name recognition remains in Kansas -- 85 percent of likely voters know enough about him to rate him favorably or unfavorably without so much as a title or even party affiliation from the pollster to go on -- and that his favorable ratings are pretty darn good (48 percent positive, 37 percent negative) considering that he has been out of office for 14 years and the state hasn't elected a Democrat to the Senate since 1932. Roberts' numbers aren't bad either (56 percent favorable, 40 percent unfavorable). But hits like this timely one from the Slattery campaign could help bring those numbers down.

After a nearly four-year investigation, the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence today released their final phase II report on prewar Iraq intelligence.

[...]

[Said Slattery:] "Why didn't Roberts' [who was the top Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2002-2003, during the lead-up to the war in Iraq] tell the American people there were serious doubts about the reliability of the intelligence and that Saddam Hussein had nothing to do with 9-11? Why didn't he raise objections when Administration officials portrayed an open-and-shut case that Iraq was developing nuclear weapons and working with al Qaeda?

"As the top Republican on the committee he certainly should have known the intelligence didn't support these claims."

For three years Roberts repeatedly delayed the publication of the report in an attempt to protect the Bush Administration.

"As a citizen and political outsider, I find it completely unacceptable that our government failed us on so many counts during the lead up to the war in Iraq," Slattery said. "Ultimately, Chairman Roberts and the Senate Intelligence Committee failed in their oversight responsibility, both going into the war and in getting to the bottom of what happened in a timely manner."

This could be a fun one, particularly with a Kansan (Barack Obama) topping the Democratic ticket and another Kansan (Governor Kathleen Sebelius) potentially being the number two on the ticket, as well. If you want to help Slattery make the most of this opportunity to go after Roberts, head over to Act Blue today.

There's more...

BruinKid's Senate race rankings

So with less than half a year to go, it's time for another look at all the 2008 Senate races.  There are 35 seats up for election because of a scenario in Wyoming and Mississippi where both seats are up, due to the passing of Craig Thomas and the resignation of Trent Lott, respectively.  Now obviously, quite a few of the races are considered "safe" for the incumbent.  So I'll rank these in terms of tiers.  The top tier will be the races where the party holding the seat has a real shot of switching.  The second tier are races that could become top tier races, but are not at this point.  Tier III are ones where a major event would need to happen for the seat to come into play.  And the safe seats?  Well, Mike Gravel has a better shot at winning the presidency than those incumbents have of losing their races.

Follow me below the fold for all the races.  This is meant to be a primer for both newcomers and political junkies alike, so some of the information may seem repetitive for you junkies out there.  Also see my previous March diary to see what things have changed since my last update.

There's more...

BruinKid's Senate race rankings

So with less than half a year to go, it's time for another look at all the 2008 Senate races.  There are 35 seats up for election because of a scenario in Wyoming and Mississippi where both seats are up, due to the passing of Craig Thomas and the resignation of Trent Lott, respectively.  Now obviously, quite a few of the races are considered "safe" for the incumbent.  So I'll rank these in terms of tiers.  The top tier will be the races where the party holding the seat has a real shot of switching.  The second tier are races that could become top tier races, but are not at this point.  Tier III are ones where a major event would need to happen for the seat to come into play.  And the safe seats?  Well, Mike Gravel has a better shot at winning the presidency than those incumbents have of losing their races.

Follow me below the fold for all the races.  This is meant to be a primer for both newcomers and political junkies alike, so some of the information may seem repetitive for you junkies out there.  Also see my previous March diary to see what things have changed since my last update.

There's more...

KS-Sen: Slattery Within Striking Distance

No Democrat since 1932 has won election to the United States Senate from Kansas, but that's not stopping former Democratic Congressman Jim Slattery from making a real pass at it this year.

Before March, the Unites States Senate election in Kansas was a shoe-in for Republican incumbent Pat Roberts. At that point there was no viable Democratic candidate in the race and the state has not elected a Democratic senator since 1932. However, the decision by Democratic Congressmen Jim Slattery to run for office has made the race potentially more interesting.

The latest Rasmussen Reports telephone survey of Kansas voters found Roberts leading Slattery 52% to 40%.

The incumbent leads Slattery by twenty-one points among male voters, but just six percent among women.

The Democratic challenger leads Roberts by three points among unaffiliated voters. Roberts earns the vote from 82% of Republicans while Slattery attracts 75% of Democrats.

This isn't a race that anyone expects Slattery to win or even necessarily to make tight. What's more, at this point Slattery does trail by a statistically significant margin. However, Slattery is well within striking distance at this point. Behind by just 12 points and already keeping the incumbent at around 50 percent, Slattery is already forcing both Roberts and the National Republican Senatorial Committee to take this race seriously. If you want to help Slattery make the most of this opportunity, head over to Act Blue today and make a difference.

There's more...

KS-Sen: Slattery Raises $288,000 in 12 Days

First former Democratic Congressman Jim Slattery was looking at a bid against incumbent Republican Senator Pat Roberts in Kansas, then he nearly got in, then he decided not to run, then he reconsidered, and then, just last month, he jumped in. And in less than two weeks, Slattery raised a very respectable amount of money for a Senate campaign in a state like Kansas.

Jim Slattery finally unveiled his campaign for the U.S. Senate on Saturday, telling a partisan audience that the time had come to end the "breathtaking incompetence" in Washington.

Slattery, a former six-term congressman from Topeka, decried the run-up to the war in Iraq, America's faulty health-care system, the failure to more aggressively address the environment, and runaway spending that he termed "generational robbery."

[...]

Slattery, 59, is a late entry in the 2008 U.S. Senate sweepstakes and faces a formidable opponent in two-term incumbent Pat Roberts. Nearly half the state's voters are registered as Republicans, and they outnumber registered Democrats by about 322,000.

[...]

Republicans hold 23 of the 34 Senate seats up for election this year. Democrats are targeting 17 of those seats, including Roberts' seat. The incumbent raised $522,024 in the year's first quarter and had about $3 million on hand as of March 31.

Slattery raised $288,000 in the 12 days after filing paperwork on March 19.

Slattery still has a lot of ground to make up, both in the head-to-head race (I'd imagine he trails by a fairly decent amount in polling, though I don't recall having seen any hard numbers any time so recently) as well as the race for cash. That said, raising $24,000 a day isn't a bad start.

What's more, for as red as Kansas is -- it hasn't sent a Democrat to the United States Senate since 1932 -- the state is actually trending towards the Democrats at this point. In November 2006, Democratic Governor Kathleen Sebelius easily won reelection, and Republican-turned-Democrat (since turned out of office) Paul Morrison easily defeated incumbent Republican Attorney General Phill Kline. Moreover, Democrats received 49.6 percent of the two-party congressional vote in the state in 2006, suggesting that voters are willing to vote Democrat on the federal level as well as the statewide level.

If you want to help put this race on the map, head over to the Jim Slattery for Senate website or Slattery's ActBlue page.

There's more...

Diaries

Advertise Blogads