A Wealthy Nation Is A Working Nation

Timothy Noah, a writer for Slate.com, has produced an extensive series on the income gap in the United States. According to his research, wealth inequality has been growing at a rather alarming rate. As he reported, in 1973, one percent of the population held 8 percent of the nation’s income.  Today, the richest 1 percent account for 24 percent of the nation’s income.

America is the land of opportunity, built on free market principals. And in a free country, we celebrate success. The accumulation of wealth is, of course, not a bad thing.

But a free market economy — indeed our entire society — is stronger when more people are successful. The concentration of wealth into too few hands can limit the overall growth of an economy and can stifle the creativity that produces wealth.

We need leaders who will work across party lines to rebuild our economy. And we need representatives from South Carolina who will put jobs and working people ahead of rigid ideology. That why I’m hoping to earn your vote in November.

 

Investing in Infrastructure Creates Jobs Now … And For Long-Term

I was reading Robert Reich’s thoughtful column this morning and was struck by this sentence:

“In the late 1970s, the richest 1 percent of American families took in about 9 percent of the nation’s total income; by 2007, the top 1 percent took in 23.5 percent of total income.”

Let me repeat:  Only 1 percent receive almost a quarter of U.S. income.

There's more...

Make Back to School Work for ALL Children

 

Today more than ever, we must focus on educating all South Carolina children. Our economic future depends on having a well-educated work force.

Providing a quality education requires shared responsibilities … and the shared goal of educating ALL our children.

Responsibility lies with families, teachers and schools, and elected officials who set policies and funding.  Each plays a role.

 

There's more...

Make Back to School Work for ALL Children

 

Today more than ever, we must focus on educating all South Carolina children. Our economic future depends on having a well-educated work force.

Providing a quality education requires shared responsibilities … and the shared goal of educating ALL our children.

Responsibility lies with families, teachers and schools, and elected officials who set policies and funding.  Each plays a role.

 

There's more...

When You Are On Your Own ...

This past week, as a FedEx pilot based in Memphis, I experienced the difficulty of being “on my own.” Once again.

My 1995 Saturn’s air conditioner broke down, and it is HOT in Memphis in June. I’m flying at night from Laredo, TX, back to Memphis. From Laredo, I call ahead to see if the repair shop could take my car that next morning.

My plan:  I would land at midnight in Memphis and leave on my next flight that afternoon. I had from early that morning to 1:00 pm for my car to be fixed.

After going to sleep at 1:00 am, I drove over and stood in line for the place to open at 7:30 am. I made it clear that I had to pick up my car at 1:00 pm so that I would be at work on time.

At 12:45, I borrowed a bike and pedaled the couple of miles to the auto repair place. Surprise, surprise, the car was in the middle of getting fixed, and if they had to move it at the time, it would destroy the engine.

Then, I pedaled back, and got ready for work (I never quit sweating in the 96 degree heat). The repair shop guy came and picked me up in the nick of time to get to work before take off.

The bottom line, when you are “on your own,” life stinks. I like my life in South Carolina, where you can count on your family, friends, and neighbors.

I am a big believer that we are all in this together, and life is much better when we can rely on each other instead of going it alone.

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