Weekly Audit: Radical Inequality Fueled the Wall Street Meltdown

by Zach Carter, Media Consortium MediaWire Blogger   

Now that Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner isn't going to impose pay restrictions on bailed out Wall Street executives, it's critical to remember that severe economic inequality was a major factor in the financial meltdown. Our tax code funnels money into the hands of our wealthiest citizens, which means that our financial system protects the interests of the affluent—not the the average citizen. The broad divergence between our core democratic values and the existing U.S. economic structure must become part of the public debate over financial reform.    

There's more...

Weekly Audit: Obama's Regulation Overhaul Comes Up Short

by Zach Carter, TMC MediaWire Blogger 

President Barack Obama rolled out his plan to overhaul financial regulation last week. While much of the Obama plan relies on the same regulators and structures that led to the current meltdown, there is one key exception. The establishment of an independent Consumer Financial Protection Agency would give ordinary citizens a seat at the financial policy table for the first time and prevent the abuses in credit card and mortgage lending that have wreaked havoc on households all over the country.  

There's more...

Weekly Audit: Reining in the Subprime Scoundrels

 

by Zach Carter, TMC MediaWire Blogger

 President Barack Obama is scheduled to unveil his agenda for revamping financial regulation later this week. As the economy struggles though a recession created by the banking industry, it's crucial that Obama and his advisers craft a set of rules ensuring that the financial sector strengthens our economy instead of destroying it.  

There's more...

Weekly Audit: Why Accountability Matters

 

by Zach Carter, Media Consortium MediaWire Blogger 

With workers all over the globe trudging through a catastrophic recession, it's almost a given that governments will be battling the economic slide for a long time. Part of the effort to rebuild must involve new rules and regulations, but meaningful systems for economic accountability will be just as essential. If we do not hold the reckless executives who caused this crisis accountable for their actions, we risk regressing into similar turmoil in the near future.  

There's more...

The unknowable lightness of being

Cross-posted at River Twice Research.

Each month, the Federal Reserve releases its latest minutes of its last meeting along with its projections of economic activity (www.federalreserve.gov). The minutes just released indicate that its prior forecasts have been tweaked a bit, with update projections for unemployment over the next two years, GDP growth, and inflation. As new data become available, the hundreds of economists at the Fed revise and recalculate numbers, which means that any forecast rarely lasts more than a few months.

And yet, the Fed's forecasts - along with the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the Office of Management and Budget, the Congressional Budget Office and various others - are used to frame every single meaningful discussion about the economy. They become the fodder for media reports, for budgetary decisions made by companies, and for individuals who digest the sound-bites - "Fed predicts unemployment will level off at 9% next year" - that shapes their sentiment. Investors also turn to these signposts as markers to navigate a complex world.

There's more...

Diaries

Advertise Blogads