The Infrastructure Bank - An Economic Elixir?

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With Congress returning this week, 90 Second Summaries kicks back into gear for the fall. All eyes will be on President Obama as he delivers an address Thursday evening to a joint session of Congress. Mr. Obama is expected to propose a infrastructure-related program to get the economy moving again, and an infrastructure bank is a prime candidate for inclusion in this package.

Last season, we covered a prominent infrastructure bank bill by Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT3) and released an interview with the Congresswoman alongside it. Rep. DeLauro has reintroduced her proposal for the 112th Congress, so we are updating this episode to account for recent developments, and we'll be posting highlights of the interview on Thursday.

Here's the episode:

As always, the one-pager with more details is below the fold.

There's more...

The Crisis in the Developed World

By: Inoljt, http://mypolitikal.com/ 

I recently had a conversation with a college student hailing from the great country Spain. After talking about my summer activities, I asked him about the internships and jobs he had available in Spain.

He said that there was nothing. No jobs, no internships for anybody his age in Spain. No work at all. It was a crisis that had become normality. A global crisis.

It’s true. The developed world is facing an unprecedented period of weakness. All the titans of the First World are trembling. America is in the throes of high unemployment and a stagnant economy. Even so, it is better off than the other pillars of the developed world.

Japan has been stagnant for decades. The tsunami and the nuclear meltdown have intertwined with political weakness to further damage the nation.

Then there is Europe. Europe’s periphery is in danger of going bankrupt (or already bankrupt). Countries with enormous economies, such as Spain or Italy, are being sucked in this very moment.

So the developed world is in an unprecedented crisis. There are pockets of strength. Canada’s economy is strong. Germany’s economy is too strong. Australia and South Korea are benefiting from China’s economic coattails.

While the First World languishes, the Third World is booming. Brazil and Peru are leading the charge in Latin America; Africa is experiencing its best decade for a long time. And then there are the titans of India and China.

The result is that global inequality is on the decline. People have said for decades that the Third World is catching up to the First World. Sometimes this has been true; more often it has been not.

But now the Third World really is catching up, and catching up fast. It’s not pretty for the First World.

 

Age of Austerity

Republican voters are more sour on the debt deal than Democrats, and Nate Silver says polls show House Republicans owning the debt ceiling deal, creating an opportunity for Obama:

Voters’ Pavlovian reaction may simply be that fiscal austerity equals pain, which could complicate Republican messaging in the long-run.

In the short-run — depending on what happens with the markets over the next several trading days as well as with tomorrow morning’s jobs report — the question becomes whether Mr. Obama attempts to exploit the crisis by calling for stimulative measures that were lacking in the deal he signed with Republicans.

And speaking of that job's report for July: Hiring increases, expectations don't.  Via NPR, Brookings' William Dickens isn't impressed:

The July report also revised figures for the two previous months. The economy added 53,000 in May, up from an earlier estimate of 25,000; and 46,000 in June, up from 18,000.

Even so, the economy expanded at a meager 0.8 percent annual rate in the first half of the year, the slowest pace since the recession officially ended in 2009. Those figures, combined with financial troubles in the eurozone in recent days, have ratcheted up talk of a double-dip recession and put markets on edge in the past week.

"If Europe gets its act together and we don't have any more brinkmanship in the political arena here, I can see us just limping through without a double-dip recession," Dickens said.

Surely we've seen the end of "brinkmanship" hostage taking.  Dickens argues that the Fed is out of options. Dean Baker says not so quick:

... the Fed could pursue a path that Bernanke himself had advocated for Japan when he was still a Princeton professor. It could target a higher rate of inflation, for example 4 percent. This would have the effect of reducing real interest rates. It would also lower the debt burden of homeowners, which could allow them to spend more money.

That could relieve some pressure on consumers, but the numbers today are still a little good news in a sea of bad.  Private sector growth is almost -- but not entirely -- negating public sector cut backs.  Until something different than what we're doing is done, we'll be applauding "not as bad as it could have been" right into the double dip and President Mittens!/Bachmann/Perry's first term.

Age of Austerity

Republican voters are more sour on the debt deal than Democrats, and Nate Silver says polls show House Republicans owning the debt ceiling deal, creating an opportunity for Obama:

Voters’ Pavlovian reaction may simply be that fiscal austerity equals pain, which could complicate Republican messaging in the long-run.

In the short-run — depending on what happens with the markets over the next several trading days as well as with tomorrow morning’s jobs report — the question becomes whether Mr. Obama attempts to exploit the crisis by calling for stimulative measures that were lacking in the deal he signed with Republicans.

And speaking of that job's report for July: Hiring increases, expectations don't.  Via NPR, Brookings' William Dickens isn't impressed:

The July report also revised figures for the two previous months. The economy added 53,000 in May, up from an earlier estimate of 25,000; and 46,000 in June, up from 18,000.

Even so, the economy expanded at a meager 0.8 percent annual rate in the first half of the year, the slowest pace since the recession officially ended in 2009. Those figures, combined with financial troubles in the eurozone in recent days, have ratcheted up talk of a double-dip recession and put markets on edge in the past week.

"If Europe gets its act together and we don't have any more brinkmanship in the political arena here, I can see us just limping through without a double-dip recession," Dickens said.

Surely we've seen the end of "brinkmanship" hostage taking.  Dickens argues that the Fed is out of options. Dean Baker says not so quick:

... the Fed could pursue a path that Bernanke himself had advocated for Japan when he was still a Princeton professor. It could target a higher rate of inflation, for example 4 percent. This would have the effect of reducing real interest rates. It would also lower the debt burden of homeowners, which could allow them to spend more money.

That could relieve some pressure on consumers, but the numbers today are still a little good news in a sea of bad.  Private sector growth is almost -- but not entirely -- negating public sector cut backs.  Until something different than what we're doing is done, we'll be applauding "not as bad as it could have been" right into the double dip and President Mittens!/Bachmann/Perry's first term.

Age of Austerity

Republican voters are more sour on the debt deal than Democrats, and Nate Silver says polls show House Republicans owning the debt ceiling deal, creating an opportunity for Obama:

Voters’ Pavlovian reaction may simply be that fiscal austerity equals pain, which could complicate Republican messaging in the long-run.

In the short-run — depending on what happens with the markets over the next several trading days as well as with tomorrow morning’s jobs report — the question becomes whether Mr. Obama attempts to exploit the crisis by calling for stimulative measures that were lacking in the deal he signed with Republicans.

And speaking of that job's report for July: Hiring increases, expectations don't.  Via NPR, Brookings' William Dickens isn't impressed:

The July report also revised figures for the two previous months. The economy added 53,000 in May, up from an earlier estimate of 25,000; and 46,000 in June, up from 18,000.

Even so, the economy expanded at a meager 0.8 percent annual rate in the first half of the year, the slowest pace since the recession officially ended in 2009. Those figures, combined with financial troubles in the eurozone in recent days, have ratcheted up talk of a double-dip recession and put markets on edge in the past week.

"If Europe gets its act together and we don't have any more brinkmanship in the political arena here, I can see us just limping through without a double-dip recession," Dickens said.

Surely we've seen the end of "brinkmanship" hostage taking.  Dickens argues that the Fed is out of options. Dean Baker says not so quick:

... the Fed could pursue a path that Bernanke himself had advocated for Japan when he was still a Princeton professor. It could target a higher rate of inflation, for example 4 percent. This would have the effect of reducing real interest rates. It would also lower the debt burden of homeowners, which could allow them to spend more money.

That could relieve some pressure on consumers, but the numbers today are still a little good news in a sea of bad.  Private sector growth is almost -- but not entirely -- negating public sector cut backs.  Until something different than what we're doing is done, we'll be applauding "not as bad as it could have been" right into the double dip and President Mittens!/Bachmann/Perry's first term.

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