What Democrats Have Done Past Two Years: Make History

If you want to know what President Obama and the Democratic Party has done in the past two years — while making history — these two videos are a MUST watch:  Rachel Maddow

What Democrats Have Done Past Two Years: Make History

If you want to know what President Obama and the Democratic Party has done in the past two years — while making history — these two videos are a MUST watch:  Rachel Maddow

It's a Shame

It would be a damned shame if we finally lost a constituency as prized as seniors because of the current Democratic president. And yet that appear to be exactly what’s happening. In the summer of 2009, there were reports of a Democratic “problem” with seniors. Victoria McGrane and Chris Frates, writing in POLITICO, described how the town hall rage was being fueled by senior citizens. Seniors, angered by proposed cuts to Medicare floating around Congress, controversial talk of “death panels,” and the like, promised to be a concern for Democrats in the upcoming midterm elections. In 2008 they backed John McCain over Barack Obama by 8 points.

More than a year later, the news hasn’t gotten any better according to The Washington Post. A full 66% of older voters are enthusiastic about voting in November and most of them ready to cashier the Democrats. And they should be. Since they are free of the responsibilities of governing, the vocal conservative opposition has often been right.

In addition to the ones that exist with private insurance, governmental rationing regimes are not beyond the realm of possibility. People often confuse them with the completely innocuous concept of end-of-life counseling, which had been supported by Republicans in years past. The death panels, however, are notions of governmental bureaucrats—full of fulsome praise for the British system of rationing—with the power to deny care for the sake of cost-cutting. Responding to the criticism his work has engendered, bioethicist and administration official Ezekiel Emanuel assured us he was “writing really for political philosophers. [T]he average person, it's not what they're used to reading.”

As far back as 2009, there were new reports contradicting the president’s public statements that there were no cuts to Medicare in any of the proposed legislation. These days you find conservative activists warning us in the pages of The Wall Street Journal that the new reform law will: “Cut $818 billion from Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) from 2014-2023, the first 10 years of its full implementation; [Cuts] for Medicare Part B (physicians fees and other services) brings the total cut to $1.05 trillion over the first 10 years.”

There's more...

The Death of the Tennessee Democratic Party

In the 2000 presidential election, Vice President Al Gore came within four percent of winning Tennessee.

Ten years later, according to reporter Ken Whitehouse of the Nashville Post, the Tennessee Democratic Party died. To mourn its passing, Mr. Whitehouse wrote an obituary chronicling the party’s storied history.

The obituary is quite a humorous read for those with an interest in politics. The immediate occasion that prompted its writing was the resignation of Congressman Bart Gordon, who was facing an extremely difficult re-election. His seat is almost certain to be won by a Republican in the upcoming mid-terms.

Mr. Whitehouse narrates the early years of Tennessee’s Democratic Party. It was founded by President Andrew Jackson during the early part of the nineteenth century. Then:

Party saw great success in all portions of the state with the exception of East Tennessee, which stubbornly refused to bend to his will.

That feud turned bloody in the 1860s, ultimately resulting in Party having his license suspended and placed briefly under the supervision of court-ordered monitors and factions friendly to East Tennessee politicians, known more commonly as Republicans.

Afterward, however, were the days of the Solid South when Democrats controlled practically all parts of Tennessee politics for decades. Their achievements included a Secretary of State who went on to win a Nobel Peace Prize and a governor who made “the use of textbooks free in all Tennessee primary and secondary grades.”

Then came the deluge, as Mr. Whitehouse writes. President Lyndon Johnson’s signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill set the stage for a long, slow drift of white Democrats to the Republican Party. By the 1970s, Republicans controlled both Senate seats and the governorship. In the late ’70s and ’80s the Democratic Party recovered somewhat, only to be smashed once more during the ’90s.

The Tennessee Democratic “Party is survived by the cities of Memphis and Nashville.”

--Inoljt, http://mypolitikal.com/

 

 

The Death of the Tennessee Democratic Party

In the 2000 presidential election, Vice President Al Gore came within four percent of winning Tennessee.

Ten years later, according to reporter Ken Whitehouse of the Nashville Post, the Tennessee Democratic Party died. To mourn its passing, Mr. Whitehouse wrote an obituary chronicling the party’s storied history.

The obituary is quite a humorous read for those with an interest in politics. The immediate occasion that prompted its writing was the resignation of Congressman Bart Gordon, who was facing an extremely difficult re-election. His seat is almost certain to be won by a Republican in the upcoming mid-terms.

Mr. Whitehouse narrates the early years of Tennessee’s Democratic Party. It was founded by President Andrew Jackson during the early part of the nineteenth century. Then:

Party saw great success in all portions of the state with the exception of East Tennessee, which stubbornly refused to bend to his will.

That feud turned bloody in the 1860s, ultimately resulting in Party having his license suspended and placed briefly under the supervision of court-ordered monitors and factions friendly to East Tennessee politicians, known more commonly as Republicans.

Afterward, however, were the days of the Solid South when Democrats controlled practically all parts of Tennessee politics for decades. Their achievements included a Secretary of State who went on to win a Nobel Peace Prize and a governor who made “the use of textbooks free in all Tennessee primary and secondary grades.”

Then came the deluge, as Mr. Whitehouse writes. President Lyndon Johnson’s signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill set the stage for a long, slow drift of white Democrats to the Republican Party. By the 1970s, Republicans controlled both Senate seats and the governorship. In the late ’70s and ’80s the Democratic Party recovered somewhat, only to be smashed once more during the ’90s.

The Tennessee Democratic “Party is survived by the cities of Memphis and Nashville.”

--Inoljt, http://mypolitikal.com/

 

 

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