Living the Past in the Present: Voter Intimidation Tactics Still Thrive in America

Cross-posted to Project Vote's blog, Voting Matters

In observance of Black History month, it is fitting to revisit America’s less than stellar record in the ongoing effort to move toward true equality. The key to equality was recognized more than 100 years ago when newly freed African Americans were given the basic rights of citizenship and voting under the 14th and 15th Amendments, though it was not until the 1960s that equality for African Americans and other disadvantaged groups was finally acknowledged on both a legal and cultural scale with the passage of the cornerstone Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts. Yet citizens of color continue to be underrepresented in U.S. electorate, and as recently as 2008 have been the target of thinly veiled voter intimidation and suppression efforts.

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Living the Past in the Present: Voter Intimidation Tactics Still Thrive in America

Cross-posted to Project Vote's blog, Voting Matters

In observance of Black History month, it is fitting to revisit America’s less than stellar record in the ongoing effort to move toward true equality. The key to equality was recognized more than 100 years ago when newly freed African Americans were given the basic rights of citizenship and voting under the 14th and 15th Amendments, though it was not until the 1960s that equality for African Americans and other disadvantaged groups was finally acknowledged on both a legal and cultural scale with the passage of the cornerstone Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts. Yet citizens of color continue to be underrepresented in U.S. electorate, and as recently as 2008 have been the target of thinly veiled voter intimidation and suppression efforts.

There's more...

Black History Month; The Subject that Segregates

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copyright © 2009 Betsy L. Angert.  BeThink.org

The history of Black Americans is a glorious one.  It is a chronicle filled with much triumph, as well as many trials and tribulations.  Yet, many debate whether a month that commemorates people, pitch in color, defies reason.  Do the days dedicated to the acknowledgement of African American achievements divide us as a nation?  The answer, some say is a complex one.  Consider the thoughts of Columnist, Clarence Page of The Chicago Tribune.  Is Black History Month already history? Well, it depends.  Another view comes from a fellow Journalist and contributor to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Cynthia Tucker.  She is more emphatic in her evaluation.  Ms Tucker writes; Month robs blacks of part in U.S. history, It seems the subject, Black History Month, segregates opinions.  

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February is Black History Month

But you wouldn't know that if you looked at the campaign websites of the major Democratic and Republican candidates for the presidency.  At least that's what I've noticed after a quick look.  Oh, there's an exception with this very short press release on Mitt Romney's site:

http://www.mittromney.com/News/Press-Rel eases/African-American_History_Month

Black History Month was started for a reason.  Because, to be blunt, outside of the Civil War and the civil rights struggles of the 1950's and 1960's, we as a nation have often overlooked how blacks have contributed to and been affected by our nation's history.

While I realize that many candidates have just put up sites within the past 30 days, I view the lack of any mention of Black History month itself as a missed opportunity.  Sure, Iowa and New Hampshire have relatively few blacks, but the candidates and their campaigns are spending a heckuva lot of time looking to raise money all over the place.

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