CRUSH: The End of Anonymity

CRUSH - Bringing you the latest in social media news in four minutes or less. And in our own exciting news - we've gone HD, making our crushing capabilities that much clearer. Enjoy! Don't forget to join us on Facebook and Twitter, and get your daily crush at www.commonsensenms.com

Facebook took center stage this week with its annual developers conference, F8. What were the biggest announcements? Although Facebook founder Marc Zuckerberg displayed a dozen new tools and widgets, the most significant announcement to prepare for is the "open graph platform". Open Graph plans to connect all corners in the web in order to "create a Web that's smarter, more social, more personalized, and more semantically aware". As one element of this platform, website owners will have a chance to place a "Like" button on their pages, allowing Facebook to then publish whatever a user likes directly to their Facebook profile.

Of course the privacy police have already stated concern over the new development, and with good reason. When does sharing data on what we read, view, listen to, and interact with on the web become invasive as opposed to interactive? Stay tuned to CRUSH for latest in what is sure to be an upcoming battle over personalization versus privacy.

In honor of the recent celebration of Earth Day, we encourage you to fly on over to the "We Love Birds" community on Ning. Hosted by NRDC and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, "We Love Birds" is one of the best uses of Ning we've seen yet. View some of natures' finest yourself with the over 7,000 stunning photos.

While social media sites continue to innovate at a crushing speed, the honorable justices of the US Supreme Court seem to be experiencing technical difficulties. The divide between "the hip justices and hip-replacement judges" was made painfully clear during this week's court discussion over sexting and privacy rights. Embarrassing highlights from the case:

  • Chief Justice Roberts asks what the difference was between email and a pager
  • Justice Kennedy wondered what would happen if you were sent a text the same time you were sending one to someone else - "Does it say: 'Your call is important to us, and we will get back to you?"
  • Justice Scalia's confusion on service providers and concern of whether they can be shared by printing them - "You mean (the text) doesn't go right to me?"..."Could Quon print these spicy little conversations and send them to his buddies?"

In other online sex news, we would like to commend Apple's decision to trash nearly 6,000 sexually suggestive iPhone apps. Refreshing to see some leadership within corporate America, and hats off to Steve Jobs for refusing to chose profits over the objectification of women.

And that brings us to our CRUSH OF THE WEEK - Our story this week truly reveals the power of social media, as Mayor of East Haven Connecticut donated a kidney to a Facebook Friend, Carlos Sanchez, after seeing the status update Sanchez posted saying his friends and relatives had all been tested but were not a match. Making the Mayor a hero in our books, and Facebook her loyal sidekick.

CRUSH: The End of Anonymity

CRUSH - Bringing you the latest in social media news in four minutes or less. And in our own exciting news - we've gone HD, making our crushing capabilities that much clearer. Enjoy! Don't forget to join us on Facebook and Twitter, and get your daily crush at www.commonsensenms.com

Facebook took center stage this week with its annual developers conference, F8. What were the biggest announcements? Although Facebook founder Marc Zuckerberg displayed a dozen new tools and widgets, the most significant announcement to prepare for is the "open graph platform". Open Graph plans to connect all corners in the web in order to "create a Web that's smarter, more social, more personalized, and more semantically aware". As one element of this platform, website owners will have a chance to place a "Like" button on their pages, allowing Facebook to then publish whatever a user likes directly to their Facebook profile.

Of course the privacy police have already stated concern over the new development, and with good reason. When does sharing data on what we read, view, listen to, and interact with on the web become invasive as opposed to interactive? Stay tuned to CRUSH for latest in what is sure to be an upcoming battle over personalization versus privacy.

In honor of the recent celebration of Earth Day, we encourage you to fly on over to the "We Love Birds" community on Ning. Hosted by NRDC and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, "We Love Birds" is one of the best uses of Ning we've seen yet. View some of natures' finest yourself with the over 7,000 stunning photos.

While social media sites continue to innovate at a crushing speed, the honorable justices of the US Supreme Court seem to be experiencing technical difficulties. The divide between "the hip justices and hip-replacement judges" was made painfully clear during this week's court discussion over sexting and privacy rights. Embarrassing highlights from the case:

  • Chief Justice Roberts asks what the difference was between email and a pager
  • Justice Kennedy wondered what would happen if you were sent a text the same time you were sending one to someone else - "Does it say: 'Your call is important to us, and we will get back to you?"
  • Justice Scalia's confusion on service providers and concern of whether they can be shared by printing them - "You mean (the text) doesn't go right to me?"..."Could Quon print these spicy little conversations and send them to his buddies?"

In other online sex news, we would like to commend Apple's decision to trash nearly 6,000 sexually suggestive iPhone apps. Refreshing to see some leadership within corporate America, and hats off to Steve Jobs for refusing to chose profits over the objectification of women.

And that brings us to our CRUSH OF THE WEEK - Our story this week truly reveals the power of social media, as Mayor of East Haven Connecticut donated a kidney to a Facebook Friend, Carlos Sanchez, after seeing the status update Sanchez posted saying his friends and relatives had all been tested but were not a match. Making the Mayor a hero in our books, and Facebook her loyal sidekick.

CRUSH: The Great New Media Migration

CRUSH - Bringing you the latest in social media news in four minutes or less. Become a fan on Facebook and get your daily crush at www.commonsensenms.com

Unless you've been living under a rock, you know that the massive lines outside the Apple store have been for the much anticipated, release of the iPad. With over 450,000 sold, it appears that having the iPad will be as commonplace as the iPod. But while there are already 3,000 iPad-specific apps available, there is one thing noticeably absent - Adobe Flash. Apple has banned flash from any of its iPhone and iPad apps, instead choosing only programs developed in HTML5.

Another media mogul Apple is taking a bite out of? Google. Apple is challenging Google's online advertising dominance with the introduction of the iAd platform, which allows advertisers to develop interactive ads within another application. Although Apple CEO Steve Jobs has concluded it won't be able to compete with Google's search advertising, he is hoping Apple can become the leader in the mobile advertising sphere.

The war on climate change is heating up as the NRDC Action Fund rolled out its new media campaign to one-by-one get the 68 Senators who are not actively pushing for comprehensive clean energy and climate legislation to get in the game. And Senators, if you think they aren't serious, just look at the recent activity towards target number one, Scott Brown of Massachusetts...

While the NRDC Action Fund works on the Senate, fifteen-year old Parker Liautaud is showing his commitment to the environment by skiing to the North Pole. His expedition, funded by none other than General Electric, is in hopes of becoming the first person to check in at the North Pole on Foursquare, which will earn him the coveted "Last Degree" badge.

Freedom of speech has been not only a liberty our country holds with pride, but also the source of controversy when it comes to media. Most recently, the forces for a free and open internet have been dealt a blow by the U.S. Court of Appeals for D.C., taking away the FCC's power to move forward in it's plans to get more Americans connected to a faster and cheaper internet, and potentially allowing Internet service providers to block internet content they don't like. Luckily this future isn't set in stone, and a majority vote of FCC commissioners could give the power needed to both protect consumers and close America's digital divide. Go to savetheinternet.com to lend your support to this important cause.

The latest news from Twitter is bringing applause from the business community, as the site's plans for a huge redesign shows a greater emphasis on data. Hopefully this will allow better insight into solving the riddle that has plagued many of us, Tweet R-O-I.

And the quest to solve new media riddles brings us to the CRUSH of the Week, where we highlight a number of individuals who are moving up in the world after making the leap from old to new media. Proving once again that the future where new media rules the day, well, is now.

 

 

Women Wouldn't Have Named it the iPad

However, the lack of women in technology jobs is similarly striking. The San Jose Mercury News has been forceful in highlighting the issue. The newspaper conducted an analysis of ten of the Valley's largest companies. Their numbers are from 2005 but they still highlight a disturbing trend. In their analysis of these ten companies (including Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Cisco, eBay, and more), women made up just 33 percent of the workforce. This is even down from 1999, when women made up only 37 percent of all employees at these organizations.

There's more...

Better Business

The stance taken by the US Chamber of Commerce on climate change is damaging the confidence Americans have in business' ability to respond to current challenges. The Chamber has been fighting climate change legislation tooth and nail on behalf of the US coal industry that makes up a very small segment of their membership. Other business have taken notice, as the list of companies leaving the Chamber is growing. The Chamber chose to entrench its stance on the lead up to the Copenhagen climate conference and this resulted in the departure of Exelon Corp, Pacific Gas & Electric, PNM Resources, Mohawk Fine Papers, and Apple.

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Diaries

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